Imatges de pÓgina
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of his own and of others, to which no discriminating mark or signature was annexed. Of these he has acknowledged only one, the Ode to a Cuckoo, which he reprinted in a collection of his poems in 1781. Neglecting, however, the discordant testimony which has been adduced, and judging merely by internal evidence, I should have little hesitation in assigning the Ode to a Fountain, and the Imitation of Ossian to Bruce; they have great merit, especially the Ode, which exhibits much of the plaintive tenderness and style peculiar to the poet of Lochleven.

It may be thought necessary, perhaps, ere I conclude my observations, to notice a poem of considerable length, which has been communicated by a Mr. Birrel, of Kinnesswood, as an undoubted composition of Bruce. The subject, which is The Last Day, I cannot but consider as an unfortunate one, as one to which the powers of poetry are not adequate, and on which, not even the efforts of a Milton or a Klopstock could confer an interest, or cloath with a sublimity, that should meet even the expectations and already awakened imagination of the common reader.

Of two specimens by poets, possessed of strong creative powers, neither has, in my opinions, succeeded; the Last Day of Young has certainly merit, and the production of Ogilvie, on the same topic, still greater; but both have failed to excite ideas, either of terror or sublimity, equal to what the mere outline of Scripture affords; nor can the effort of our amiable bard, the last, I believe, which has been published, establish any claim to superior success; in making this attempt, he had not duly weighed his genius and his talents.

These, we have seen, were admirably calculated to excel in the walks of tenderness, simplicity and pathos; to describe in chaste, yet animated language, the beauties of Nature, and to impart a value imperishable to his pictures, from the stores of sentiment and feeling. Lochleven and the Elegy written in Spring, display a most happy combination of these qualities, and, as long as tasse and sensibility shall exist, will, we may venture to assert, never be forgotten.

As to the personal character of the Author,

if religion, if virtue, if filial piety, if fortitude, if meekness and resignation, still touch the heart and claim our warm applause, the transient life of Michael Bruce hath not been passed in vain.-O Reader! bless the memory of the 'gentle Bard, and, whilst the tear of pity trembles on thy cheek, may'st thou feel the glow of emulative hope, and learn to live like him..

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ALPHABETICAL INDEX,

ΤΟ ΤΗΣ

THIRD VOLUME,

OF

Those AUTHORS and ARTISTS on whom any criticism or
comment has been given in this volume, with the
pages where their names are to be found.

A

Alfred, 375.

Anacreon, 65.

Beattie, 261, 513, 548.

Aikin, 53, 199, 200 (note) Birrell, 550.

Blair, Dr. 371,

Bloomfield, 262.

Boiardo, 397.

Brooke, Miss, 262.

Browne, 25, 78, 185.

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Bruce, Sir John, 262,274,

313.

Bruce, Michael, 515.
Burns, 53, 262.

Burton, 77.

C

Caliph Vathek, author of

430.
Camoens, 243.

Carew, 25, 46, 51, 74.
Casaubon, 394.

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