Imatges de pÓgina
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Contents

OF

No. 5, Vol. II. for JUNE, 1821.

1.

Page On Affections of the Mucous Membrane of the Digestive Or

gans ; by Drs. BROUSSAIS, ABERCROMBIE, MEKEL, and GRIMAUD

1

II.
Dr. OSBORN's Sketch of the Physiology and Pathology of the

Urine

41

III.
Dr. Conquest's Outlines of Midwifery

47

IV.
Messrs. DalBANT, Vaidy, and others, on Arterial Inflammation

50

V.
Mr. Swan, Dr. KERRISON, and Mr. VILLERS, on Affections

of the Nerves

63

VI. Mr. James Boyle on Indian Cholera

85

VII.
Dr. Prout on the Nature and Treatment of Gravel, Calcu-

lus, &c.

89

VIII. Mr. TRAVERS on Diseases of the Eye, and their Treatment 105

IX. Dr. WHITLOCK Nicholl's General Elements of Pathology 133

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XII. Mr. CHARLES THOMAS Haden's Practical Observations on the Colchicum Autumnale

· 155

XIII.

MILITARY SURGERY.

1. Mr. GUTHRIE on Gunshot Wounds, &c.
2. Dr. HENNEN on Military Surgery
3. Messrs. LAURENT and Percy on Gunshot Wounds

165

XIV.
Mr. H. SANDWITH on the Epidemic Fever of Bridlington and
Vicinity

203

XV. Biographical Sketch of the late Dr. JAMES GREGORY, of Edinburgh

- 216

XVI.

MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE. 1. New College in Kentucky 2. Ventriloquism 3. Preparation of Opium 4. Hunterian Oration 5. Notice of an Extra Limites Department

219 ib. ib. 220 221

XVII.

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EXTRA LIMITES.
Argus.--No. 1. On Medical Conduct

Ditto-No. 2. Obstinate Pervigilium
Ditto_No. 3. The Surreptitious Knight ; or, Sir Char-

latan Glanderman
Correspondence-Junius-Philo-Criticus-Scriblomania
Bibliographical Record
Notices, &c. &c. &c.

224

228 - 230

235

On the first July will be published, Third Edition, greatly enlarged and improved, “ The Influence of Tropical Climates on European Constitutions." By JAMES Johnson, M. D.

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THE

Medico-Chirurgical Review,

AND

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE.

(Analytical Series.)

Nec tibi quid liceat sed quid fecisse decebit
Occurrat mentemque domat respectus honesti. CLAUD.

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1. Histoire des Phlegmasies, ou Inflammations Chroniques.

Vol. II. De L'inflammation de la Membrane Muqueuse des Vois Digestives. Par F. J. V. BROUSSAIS.

2. Researches on the Pathology of the Intestinal Canal. On

The Diseases of the Mucous Membranes. By John ABERCROMBIE, M.D. [Ed. Journal, 54.]

3. Sur la Structure de la Membrane Muqueuse des Intestines

dans l'Homme et dans quelques Animaux. Par M. MEKEL, Professeur à l'Université de Halle. [Journal Complimentaire, Septembre, 1820.]

4. Sur les Phlegmasies Folliculaires. Par le Docteur AIME

GRIMAUD. [Journal Complimentaire, Decembre, 1820.) “Inflammatio quidem, ubicunque sit, non sine periculo habenda; periculo.

sior tamen, ubi membranaceas occupaverit partes, ob exquisitum, quo pollent, sensum ac concensum gravissima et funesta simul symptomata

adsociantur.” Hoffmani Opera, Tom. III. p. 223. In the second number of this Series, we took up the subject of the serous, or peritoneal coverings of the intestines and abdominal organs generally-in the third number, the mucous membrane of the lungs—and in each, we endeaVol. II, No. 5.

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voured to convey, as far as possible, to our brethren in this country, the opinions and observations of M. Broussais, one of the most celebrated pathologists on the Continent.

It is, however, on affections of the mucous membrane of the digestive organs that M. Broussais bas most distinguished himself; and this consideration, together with the great importance of the subject, will lead us into a pretty extensive analysis of the second volume of this illustrious foreigner, while we shall, at the same time, endeavour to collect and concentrate as much valuable information as possible, from other authentic sources, on the portion of pathology now under investigation.*

M. Broussais justly observes, that, when we consider the number and variety of extraneous substances, more or less stimulant, which are constantly traversing the mucous membrane of the digestive organs, it is really wonderful that we have not more frequently the phenomena of inflammation produced there. But, if we reflect on the exquisite sensibility of many portions of this membrane, and the numerous sympathies which subsist between it and almost every other part of the frame, we shall be convinced that, although actual inflammation is less frequent here than in the mucous membrane of the lungs, yet, that the morbid phenomena resulting from irritation in the primæ viæ, are infinitely more numerous and distressing than all the rest of the catalogue of human diseases collectively. We have, says M. Broussais, continually before our eyes, whole crowds of people who spend their time in tormenting the stomach with every thing burning and irritating which the animal and vegetable kingdoms can producc; and our books of pathology are filled with discussions of gastric and bilious derangements. If a drunkard dies of inanition, from defect of digestion, we are told of the loss of tone, or induration of the fibres of the stomach :-If he becomes dropsical-or dysenteric the same explanation. Yet if we examine the symptoms exhibited by this class of patients, we shall find them correspond

* The critical expositions of M. Broussais's doctrines which have been drawn up in France, and republished in England, convey little or no idea of the valuable facts and observations on which those doctrines are founded. They are shadowy unsubstantial outlines magnified by generalities, but devoid of all useful and iangible particulars. Like criticisms in general, they have separated the grain from the chaff-leaving the grain behind. On coming to the examination of M. Broussais's work after perusing these er

we found ourselves utter strangers to the real nature and true value of the pub. lication. We are much mistaken it most of our readers are not in the same predicamente

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