Imatges de pÓgina
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Mentre un caldo vapor (ne senti pria)

Da quel lato si spinge ove mi duole,
Che forse amanti nelle lor parole

Chiaman sospir ; io non so che si sia :
Parte rinchiusa, e turbida si cela

Scosso mi il petto, e poi n'uscendo poco

Quivi d' attorno o s'agghiaccia, o s'ingiela ;
Ma quanto a gli occhi giunge a trovar loco

Tutte le notti a me suol far piovose
Finche mia Alba rivien colma di rose.

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VI
Giovane piano, e semplicetto amante

Poi che fuggir me stesso in dubbio sono,
Madonna a voi del mio cuor l'humil dono

Farò divoto ; io certo a prove tante
L'hebbi fedele, intrepido, costante,

De pensieri leggiadro, accorto, e buono ;
Quando rugge il gran mondo, e scocca il tuono,

S'arma di se, e d'intero diamante,
Tinto del forse, e d'invidia sicuro,

Di timori, e speranze al popol use

Quanto d'ingegno, e d'alto valor vago,
E di cetra sonora, e delle muse :

Sol troverete in tal parte men duro
Ove amor mise l’insanabil ago.

VII
How soon hath Time the suttle theef of youth,

Stoln on his wing my three and twentith yeer !
My hasting dayes Alie on with full career,

But my late spring no bud or blossom shew'th.
Perhaps my semblance might deceive the truth,

That I to manhood am arriv'd so near,
And inward ripenes doth much less appear,

That som more timely-happy spirits indu'th.
Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow,

It shall be still in strictest measure eev'n,

To that same lot, however mean, or high,
Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heav'n ;

All is, if I have grace to use it so,
As ever in my great task Masters eye.

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VIII
Captain or Colonel, or Knight in Arms,

Whose chance on these defenceless dores may sease,
If ever deed of honour did thee please,

Guard them, and him within protect from harms,
He can requite thee, for he knows the charms

That call Fame on such gentle acts as these,
And he can spred thy Name o’re Lands and Seas,

What ever clime the Suns bright circle warms.
Lift not thy spear against the Muses Bowre,

The great Emathian Conqueror bid spare

The house of Pindarus, when Temple and Towre
Went to the ground: And the repeated air

Of sad Electra's Poet had the power
To save th' Athenian Walls from ruine bare.

IX
Lady that in the prime of earliest youth,

Wisely hath shun'd the broad way and the green,
And with those few art eminently seen,
That labour up the Hill of heav'nly Truth,
The better part with Mary and with Ruth,
Chosen thou hast, and they that overween,
And at thy growing vertues fret their spleen,
No anger find in thee, but pity and ruth.
Thy care is fixt and zealously attends

To fill thy odorous Lamp with deeds of light,

And Hope that reaps not shame. Therefore be sure
Thou, when the Bridegroom with his feastfull friends

Passes to bliss at the mid hour of night,
Hast gain'd thy entrance, Virgin wise and pure.

X
Daughter to that good Earl, once President

Of Englands Counsel, and her Treasury,
Who liv'd in both, unstain'd with gold or fee,

And left them both, more in himself content,
Till the sad breaking of that Parlament
VIII. Camb. autograph supplies title, When the assault was intended to the
city 3 If deed of honour did thee ever please, 1673.
IX. 5 with Ruth] the Ruth 1645.
X. Camb. autograph supplies title, To the Lady Margaret Ley.

IO

Broke him, as that dishonest victory
At Charonéa, fatal to liberty

Kild with report that Old man eloquent,
Though later born, then to have known the dayes

Wherin your Father flourisht, yet by you

Madam, me thinks I see him living yet;
So well your words his noble vertues praise,

That all both judge you to relate them true,
And to possess them, Honour'd Margaret.

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Arcades.

Part of an entertainment presented to the Countess Dowager of Darby at Harefield, by som Noble persons of her Family, who appear on the Scene in pastoral habit, moving toward the

seat of State with this Song.

I. SONG.
Look Nymphs, and Shepherds look,
What sudden blaze of majesty
Is that which we from hence descry
Too divine to be mistook :

This this is she
To whom our vows and wishes bend,
Heer our solemn search hath end.

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Fame that her high worth to raise,
Seem'd erst so lavish and profuse,
We may justly now accuse
Of detraction from her praise,

Less then half we find exprest,
Envy bid conceal the rest.

Mark what radiant state she spreds,
In circle round her shining throne,
Shooting her beams like silver threds,
This this is she alone,

Sitting like a Goddes bright,

In the center of her light.

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Might she the wise Latona be,
Or the towred Cybele,
Mother of a hunderd gods;
Juno dare's not give her odds;
Who had thought this clime had held
A deity so unparaleld ?

As they com forward, the genius of the Wood appears, and

turning toward them, speaks.

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Gen. Stay gentle Swains, for though in this disguise,
I see bright honour sparkle through your eyes,
Of famous Arcady ye are, and sprung
Of that renowned flood, so often sung,
Divine Alpheus, who by secret sluse,
Stole under Seas to meet his Arethuse ;
And ye the breathing Roses of the Wood,
Fair silver-buskind Nymphs as great and good,
I know this quest of yours, and free intent
Was all in honour and devotion ment
To the great Mistres of yon princely shrine,
Whom with low reverence I adore as mine,
And with all helpful service will comply
To further this nights glad solemnity;
And lead ye where ye may more neer behold
What shallow-searching Fame hath left untold ;
Which I full oft amidst these shades alone
Have sate to wonder at, and gaze upon :
For know by lot from Jove I am the powr
Of this fair Wood, and live in Oak'n bowr,
To nurse the Saplings tall

, and curl the grove
With Ringlets quaint, and wanton windings wove.
And all my Plants I save from nightly ill,
Of noisom winds, and blasting vapours chill.
And from the Boughs brush off the evil dew,
And heal the harms of thwarting thunder blew,
Or what the cross dire-looking. Planet smites,
Or hurtfull Worm with canker'd venom bites.
When Eey'ning gray doth rise, I fetch my round
Over the mount, and all this hallow'd ground,
And early ere the odorous breath of morn
Awakes the slumbring leaves, or tasseld horn

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Shakes the high thicket, haste I all about,
Number my ranks, and visit every sprout
With puissant words, and murmurs made to bless,
But els in deep of night when drowsines
Hath lockt up mortal sense, then listen I
To the celestial Sirens harmony,
That sit upon the nine enfolded Sphears,
And sing to those that hold the vital shears,
And turn the Adamantine spindle round,
On which the fate of gods and men is wound.
Such sweet compulsion doth in musick ly,
To lull the daughters of Necessity,
And keep unsteddy Nature to her law,
And the low world in measur'd motion draw
After the heavenly tune, which none can hear
Of human mould with grosse unpurged ear;
And yet such musick worthiest were to blaze
The peerles height of her immortal praise,
Whose lustre leads us, and for her most fit,
If my inferior hand or voice could hit
Inimitable sounds, yet as we go,
What ere the skill of lesser gods can show,
I will assay, her worth to celebrate,
And so attend ye toward her glittering state;
Where ye may all that are of noble stemm
Approach, and kiss her sacred vestures hemm.

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2. SONG.

O're the smooth enameld green
Where no print of step hath been,

Follow me as I sing,

And touch the warbled string.
Under the shady roof
Of branching Elm Star-proof,

Follow me,
I will bring you where she sits
Clad in splendor as befits

Her deity.
Such a rural Queen
All Arcadia hath not seen.

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