The Theory and Analysis of Drama

Portada
Cambridge University Press, 25 d’oct. 1991 - 339 pàgines
Manfred Pfister's book is the first to provide a coherent and comprehensive framework for the analysis of plays in all their dramatic and theatrical dimensions. The materical on which his analysis is based covers all genres and periods of drama, from Greek tragedy and comedy to the contemporary theatre, with the plays of Shakespeare providing a special focus. His approach is not historical but systematic, combining more abstract categorisations with detailed and concrete interpretations of specific sample texts. An extensive international bibliography of relevant theatre and drama studies further enhances the practical value of the book.
 

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Continguts

Drama and the dramatic
1
112 The structuralist deficit
2
122 A communication model for narrative and dramatic texts
3
123 The absolute nature of dramatic texts
4
124 The rimespace structures of narrative and dramatic texts
4
13 Drama as a multimedia form of presentation
4
132 The repertoire of codes and channels
4
133 The collective nature of production and reception
4
4523 Soliloquies of action and reflection
136
453 Asides
137
4532 The aside adspectatores
139
4533 The dialogical aside
140
462 Quantitative relations
141
4622 Frequency of interruption and speech length
142
succession and simultaneity
144
4632 The relationships between dialogues
146

Drama and the theatre
13
213 Stagedirections in the secondary text
15
215 Variability in the relationship between the enacted text and the literary text substratum
16
216 The interrelationship of the sign systems
17
22 Dramatic text and theatre design
19
222 Stagearea and fictional locale
22
223 Actor and fictional figure
23
24 Theatre as a social institution
25
242 A model for the external communication system of dramatic texts
26
243 The sociology of authorship
27
244 The sociology of mediating channels
30
245 The sociology of reception
31
246 The sociology of content
32
247 The sociology of symbolic forms
34
25 The dramatic text and the audience
36
252 The social psychology of collective reception
37
253 Feedback from the audience to the stage
38
Sending and receiving information
40
32 Advance information and the audiences horizon of expectations
41
322 Thematic advance information
42
33 The interrelationship of verbal and nonverbal information
44
332 Identity
45
333 Complementarity
46
334 Discrepancy
48
34 Levels of awareness in the dramatic figures and the audience
49
3411 Superior audience awareness
51
3412 Inferior audience awareness
52
342 Congruent awareness
54
343 Dramatic irony
55
35 The perspective structure of dramatic texts
57
352 The hierarchical arrangement of figureperspectives
59
353 Techniques used to control and coordinate the perspectives
60
3531 Aperspectival information
61
3532 The selection of figureperspectives
63
3533 The combination of figureperspectives
64
354 Types of perspective structure
65
3541 Aperspectival structure
66
3542 Closed perspective structure
67
36 Epic communication structures in drama
69
3612 The abolition of concentration
70
362 Techniques of epic communication
71
3622 The introduction of epic elements by figures outside the action
74
3623 The introduction of epic elements by figures inside the action
76
3624 Nonverbal epic tendencies
83
3625 The repertoire of epic techniques
84
372 The transmission of information at the beginning of the drama
86
3722 Isolated versus integrated exposition
87
3723 The dominant form of temporal reference
88
3724 Monological versus dialogical exposition
90
373 The transmission of information at the end of the drama
95
3732 Open endings in drama
96
374 Information and suspense
98
3742 The parameters of suspense
99
3743 Short and longterm suspense
101
3744 Can suspense be measured?
102
Verbal communication
103
412 Dimensions of deviation
104
42 The polyfunctionality of dramatic language
105
422 Referential function
106
423 Expressive function
109
424 Appellative function
111
425 Phatic function
113
426 Metalingual function
115
427 Poetic function
117
43 Verbal communication and action
118
432 The nonidentity of speech and action
119
44 Verbal communication and dramatic figure
120
4412 The superimposition of epic communication structures on figure reference
121
4413 The superimposition of references to the situation on figure reference
122
442 Characterisation through language
124
4422 Implicit selfpresentation
125
45 Monological speech
126
4512 Soliloquy versus monologicity dialogue versus dialogicity
127
4513 Monological tendencies in dialogue
129
4514 Dialogical tendencies in soliloquies
130
452 Soliloquy
131
4522 Premeditated form versus spontaneous improvisation
134
464 The syntagmatics of dialogue
147
4643 How an utterance relates to the previous utterances by the other figures
148
465 The rhetoric of dialogue
154
4653 Figurative speech
156
Dramatis personae and dramatic figure
160
522 Restrictions in the portrayal of figure in drama
161
523 Figure as the focal point of contrasts and correspondences
163
53 Dramatis personae configuration and figure constellation
164
5311 Size
165
5313 Qualitative correspondences and contrasts
166
532 The constellation of figures as a dynamic structure of interaction
170
533 Configuration
171
5332 Configuration structure
172
54 Figure conception and characterisation
176
5412 Static versus dynamic figure conception
177
5413 Mono versus multidimensional conceptions of figure
178
5414 Personification type individual
179
5415 Open versus closed figure conception
180
5416 Transpsychological versus psychological figure conception
182
542 Characterisation
183
5422 Explicitfigural characterisation techniques
184
5423 Implicitfigural characterisation techniques
190
5424 Explicitauthorial characterisation techniques
194
Story and plot
196
6112 Story versus mythos or plot
197
612 Action
199
6123 Action versus event
200
62 Presenting the story
201
6212 The principle of concentration
202
622 Techniques of presentation
204
6222 Types of narrative mediation
207
6223 Multiple presentation
209
63 The combination of sequences
211
631 The coordination of sequences
212
6313 Linking devices
215
6314 Functions
216
632 The superimposition of sequences
219
6321 Dream inset
220
6322 The playwithintheplay
223
64 Segmentation and composition
230
642 The segmentation of the dramatic presentation
234
6422 Units of segmentation
236
643 Composition
239
6431 Closed form
240
6432 Open forms
242
Structures of time and space
246
72 Open and closed structures of time and space
249
7212 The abolition of the unities of time and space
250
722 Dramatic practice
252
7222 Open structures of time and space
253
7223 Discordance in structures of time and space
256
731 The semantic interpretation of space
257
7312 The relationships between stage and offstage
258
7313 The relationships between a number of different locales
259
7314 Fictional locale versus real spatial context
260
7315 The locale and the events
261
732 The conceptions of space
262
7322 Functions
265
733 Localisation techniques
267
7332 Nonverbal localisation techniques
269
74 The structure and presentation of time
275
742 Succession and simultaneity
276
743 The presentation of time
279
7432 Fictional time and actual performance time
283
744 The conception of time
288
7442 Progression versus stasis
289
7443 Linear versus cyclical movement
290
745 Tempo
291
7452 Deep structure and surface structure
292
7453 The tempo of the text as a whole
293
Concluding note
295
Notes
296
Bibliography
315
II Texts
316
III Theory and criticism
320
Index of authors
337
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