Imatges de pÓgina
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and Abraham Albrecht, together with brother Sydenfaden, who is supported by the Netherland Society, all of whom accompanied Mr. Kicherer and the Hottentots in their return from Holland, had departed from the Cape, in order to introduce the gospel among the Namacquas, a remote and untutored tribe, situated at about a month's

journey from the station at the Great Orange River, occupied by Anderson and Kramer.

These brethren began their journey on the 22d of May, 1805, and suffered much in passing through the barren deserts. They had not only to provide for themselves, but for those who con. ducted their waggons, eleven persons in the whole, which they found ex. ceedingly difficult, and were at one time ready to faint; when, according to an earnest wish they had expressed to each other, that Cornelius Kok, (a Hottentot who resided in that part of the country) would come to their as sistance, they were almost immediately gratified with the appearance of his son, who assured them that his father was coming to help them with two yoke of oxen. This proved a great relief for the present; but in the prosecution of their journey fresh difficulties occurred, every one being ready to perish with hunger and thirst: they met with repeated disappointments where they expected to find wa ter; and were obliged to lodge in places infested with wild beasts, and where the Boschemen had before murdered all the inhabitants.

In these distressing circumstances it was determined that Mr. Christian Albrecht, and some attendants, should proceed to the Great Namacquas, to explore the country, and learn the dis position of the people. This was hap pily effected; and he returned with the joyful news that he had discovered two fountains, which they called "The Happy Deliverance," and "The Silent Hope." At the latter they shortly arrived, rejoicing in the merciful preservation they had experi enced, and still more in the apparent readiness of the poor pagans to receive the gospel message. At the close of the year 1805, their work commenced in this place. They found, however, that their settlement would be more conveniently formed at "The Happy

Deliverance," which was but a few miles distant from "The Silent Hope." Having heard that Chacab, the chief of a kraal in that neighbourhood, was inclined to receive the word, brother Sydenfaden was dispatched to the place of his residence, where, under a tree, he preached the gospel to him and his people. After the service was concluded, the chief expressed his satisfaction with what he had heard, and said: "This word is too great that we should not accept it. All the chiefs of Namacqua-land must come hither to hear; hither must they come, under this tree, to hear: then shall they find that the word of God is great. Harmony must also prevail; all the chiefs must have one heart and mind, and accept this doctrine: then the doctrine must be established in the centre of the country, that every one may have access to it."

This declaration of a person of influence, filled the heart of the missionary with joy, which was, however, soon damped by the efforts of one Absalom, who was esteemed as a kind of sorcerer among these benighted people. This wicked man laboured to fill their minds with prejudice, and to dissuade them from paying any attention to the word; and at first so far prevailed, that brother Sydenfaden thought his life in danger. But when he reproved him before the people, face to face, he was ashamed, trembled, and promised to make no further opposition. The chief, Chacab, declared that he was still attached to the missionary, and said, "I would fain accept the word of God. I shall come myself, and see if the Oorlam Hottentots accept of it; and if they do, I shall then make it my business that all the chiefs of the whole Namaequa-land shall accept it; for if I only accept it, I shall be murdered by the rest, and it will occasion a war."

This pleasing event, together with the accession of a considerable number of the Hottentots from the surrounding country, determined the brethren to continue at the Happy

These are Hottentots who have lived with the peasants among the Christians, and are therefore considered by the Namacquas as better informed, and more civilized than themselves.

Deliverance, notwithstanding considerable difficulties with which they had to struggle. It was found necessary to erect a building in which divine service might be held, for in the open air they were exposed to danger from venemous creatures which abound; one evening, while preaching, a serpent entwined itself about the leg of Christian Albrecht, but, happily, left him without doing any injury. In the beginning of March, 1806, they were making bricks for the intended building. In the month of May last, this missionary was obliged to visit the Cape to procure necessary provisions, and expected to return to the settlement in June. The brethren were then fully determined on continuing with the people, should they be able to maintain themselves in that spot. They had laid out a garden, but were doubtful of its success; they were apprehensive also that the country would prove too dry and barren for the production of corn, so that they expected to be obliged to live wholly without bread; but they were in hopes that, from their vicinity to two large fountains, and four smaller ones, they should be preserved from the effects of excessive drought, and enabled to maintain their cattle, upon which they must principally depend for subsistence. Under all these discourage. ments, however, these new missionaries, who appear to be entirely devoted to the service of Christ, derive comfort from the prospect of usefulness to the poor heathen. They are very thankful to God for his most merciful preservation, when travelling through the desert, and guiding them to a people who seem willing to receive the gospel. "We have suffered," say they, "very much, during our journey through the barren deserts: but God shews us that he is a hearer of the prayers of his servants. We foresee that we shall be for sometime in want and poverty; but if we exert ourselves, and keep up our spirits, we trust the Lord will assist us in procuring necessary food. We have upwards of three hundred of the Oorlam and River Hottentots with us, who have now daily an opportunity of being in. structed in the truths of the gospel. It appears to us that the heathen here have a desire to be acquainted with

Religious C

TIME, A MESSENGER CHARG

THE vicissitudes of day and night, and the changes and suc cession of the seasons, as they answer important purposes in common life, so are they of great use to awaken moral and religious reflections. If time were as unvaried in its circumstances, as it is silent in its motions, it

would seem to stand still, and we should scarcely notice its progress. Time is in scripture compared to a swift messenger, who comes charged with momentous information. This information it communicates daily; every morning and every evening; at every change of the seasons; and with peculiar solemnity when one year ends, and a new one We will at this season pay some attention to its reports.

commences.

Time proclaims a God. "The heavens declare his glory, and the firmament displays his handy works. Day unto day utters speech; night unto night shows forth knowledge." The orderly succession of the seasons and the liberal productions of the earth repeat and enforce the same important truth. If we dwelt in one unvaried scene of the same surrounding objects, though the evidence of an existing divinity, might be as decisive to reason, yet it would not be so striking and impressive, as it is amidst this variety of objects, which the changes of day and night, of summer and winter present to us. It is astonishing, that, when God so clearly manifests himself to

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