A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer: Comprising Ancient and Modern Military Technical Terms, Historical Accounts of All North American Indians, as Well as Ancient Warlike Tribes; Also Notices of Battles from the Earliest Period to the Present Time, with a Concise Explanation of Terms Used in Heraldry and the Offices Thereof. The Work Also Gives Valuable Geographical Information

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L. R. Hamersly & Company, 1881 - 659 pÓgines
 

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PÓgina 100 - If, upon marches, guards or in quarters, different corps of the army shall happen to join or do duty together, the officer highest in rank of the line of the army, marine corps or militia, by commission, there on duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders for what is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by the President of the United States, according to the nature of the case.
PÓgina 246 - The officers and soldiers of any troops, whether militia or others, being mustered and in pay of the United States, shall, at all times and in all places, when joined, or acting in conjunction with the regular forces...
PÓgina 317 - ... and safety of the army, and of such deception as does not involve the breaking of good faith either positively pledged, regarding agreements entered into during the war, or supposed by the modern law of war to exist. Men who take up arms against one another in public war do not cease on this account to be moral beings, responsible to one another, and to God.
PÓgina 246 - No person shall be liable to be tried and punished by a general court-martial for any offense which appears to have been committed more than two years before the issuing of the order for such trial, unless, by reason of having absented himself, or of some other manifest impediment, he shall not have been amenable to justice within that period.
PÓgina 465 - A prisoner of war, being a public enemy, is the prisoner of the Government and not of the captor. No ransom can be paid by a prisoner of war to his individual captor or to any officer in command. The Government alone releases captives, according to rules prescribed by itself.
PÓgina 88 - ART. 71. When a member shall be challenged by a prisoner, he must state his cause of challenge, of which the court shall, after due deliberation, determine the relevancy or validity, and decide accordingly; and no challenge to more than one member at a time shall be received by the court.
PÓgina 317 - Military necessity does not admit of cruelty, that is, the infliction of suffering for the sake of suffering or for revenge, nor of maiming or wounding except in fight, nor of torture to extort confessions. It does not admit of the use of poison in any way, nor of the wanton devastation of a district.
PÓgina 394 - HISTORY), means that portion of the kingdom over which the English rule and English law was acknowledged. There is so much vagueness in the meaning of the term, that a few words of explanation appear necessary. The vagueness arises from the great fluctuations which the English authority underwent in Ireland at various periods, and from the consequent fluctuation of the actual territorial limits of the Pale. The designation dates from the reign of John, •who distributed the portion of Ireland then...
PÓgina 317 - ... every enemy of importance to the hostile government, or of peculiar danger to the captor; it allows of all destruction of property, and obstruction of the ways and channels of traffic, travel, or communication, and of all withholding of sustenance or means of life from the enemy...
PÓgina 79 - This rule does not interfere with the right of the victorious invader to tax the people or their property, to levy forced loans, to billet soldiers, or to appropriate property, especially houses, lands, boats or ships, and churches, for temporary and military uses.

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