Imatges de pÓgina
PDF
EPUB

SECOND EDITION.

T H E

CANTING ACADEMY;

'o R,

VILLANIES DISCOVERED:

WHEREIN ARE SHEWN

The Mysterious and Villanous Practices of that Wicked

Crew, commonly known by the Names of HECTORS, TRAPANNERS, GILTS, &c. With several NEW CATCHES and SONGS.

ALSO A

COMPLEAT CANTING DICTIONARY,

BOTH OF

Old Words, and such as are now most in Use. A Book very useful and neceffary (to be known, but

not practised) for all People,

THE SECOND EDITION.

L ONDON: Printed by F. LEACH, for Mat. Drew; and are to be

sold by the Booksellers.

N. B. The Dedication is figned, R. Head,

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

OTHERWISE (VULGARLY) CALLED
NE W G A TE.

Giving an Account of the Humours of those ColLEGIANs whoʻare strictly examined at the OLD Baily, and take their highest Degrees

near HYDE PARK CORNER. Being very useful to all Persons, either Gentle or Simple,

in shewing them the Manner of the ROBBERIES and CHEATS committed by Villains on the Nation; whereby they may be the more careful of being wronged by them for the future.

L O N D ON:

PRINTED IN THE YEAR 1703.

[blocks in formation]

Ε Χ Ρ Ε Α Ν Α Τ Ι Ο Ν

[ocr errors][merged small]

CANT WORDS used by THIEVES, HOUSE-
BREAKERS, STREET ROBBERS, and
PICKPOCKETS about Town.

TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED

Some CURIOUS DISSERTATIONS on the ART

of WHEEDLING,

Α Ν D A

Collection of their FLASH SONGS, with a

PROPER GLOSSARY. The whole printed from a Copy taken on one of their Gang, in the late Scuffle between the Watchmen and a Party of them on Clerkenwell Green; which Copy is now in the Custody of one of the Constables of that Parish.

[ocr errors]

L O N D ON:
Printed for J. BROWNNELL, in Pater-noster-row.

M.DCC.LIV.
[Price Sixpence.]

P R E F A C E

TO THE

FIRST EDITIO N.

T.

HE great approbation with which fo

polite a nation as France has received the Satirical and Burlesque Dictionary of Monsieur Le Roux, testified by the several editions it has gone through, will, it is hoped, apologize for an attempt to compile an English Dictionary on a similar plan ; our language being at least as copious as the French, and as capable of the witty equivoque : besides which, the freedom of thought and fpeech arising from, and privileged by, our constitution, gives a force and poignancy to the expressions of our common people, not to be found under arbitrary governments, where the ebullitions of vulgar wit are checked by the fear of the bastinado, or of a lodging during pleasure in some gaol or castle.

The many vulgar allusions and cant expressions that fo frequently occur in our com

mon P R E FACE,

&c.

ix

mon conversation and periodical publications, make a work of this kind extremely useful, if not absolutely necessary, not only to foreigners, but even to natives resident at a diftance from the Metropolis, or who do not mix in the busy world : without some fuchhelp, they might hunt through all the ordinary Dictionaries, from Alpha to Omega, in search of the words, “ black legs, lame “ duck, a plumb, malingeror, nip cheese, “ darbies, and the new drop," although these are all terms of well-known import at Newmarket, Exchange-alley, the City, the Parade, Wapping, and Newgate.

The fashionable words, or favourite expressions of the day, also find their way into our political and theatrical compositions : these, as they generally originate from some trifling event, or temporary circumstance, on falling into disuse, or being superseded by new ones, vanish without leaving a trace behind. Such were the late fashionable words, a bore and a twaddle, among the great vul

, gar ; maccaroni and the barber, among the sinall: thefe, too, are here carefully registered.

The

« AnteriorContinua »