Miscellanies: Essays, poems and dialogues

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Pàgina 37 - And curse those councils which they praise; Would you not wonder, sir, to view Your bard a greater man than you ? Which that he is, you cannot doubt, When you have read the sequel out. You know, great sir, that ancient fellows, Philosophers, and such folks, tell us, No great analogy between Greatness and happiness is seen. If then, as it might follow straight, Wretched to be, is to be great. Forbid it, gods, that you should try What 'tis to be so great as I.
Pàgina 182 - Good-nature is that benevolent and amiable temper of mind, which disposes us to feel the misfortunes, and enjoy the happiness of others ; and, consequently, pushes us on to promote the latter, and prevent the former ; and that without any abstract contemplation on the beauty of virtue, and without the allurements or terrors of religion.
Pàgina 38 - Greatness by poets still is painted With many followers acquainted; This, too, doth in my favour speak; Your levee is but twice a week; From mine I can exclude but one day — My door is quiet on a Sunday.
Pàgina 37 - WHILE at the helm of state you ride, Our nation's envy, and its pride ; While foreign courts with wonder gaze, And curse those councils which they praise; Would you not wonder, sir, to view Your bard a greater man than you ? Which that he is, you cannot doubt, When you have read the sequel out. You know, great sir, that ancient fellows, Philosophers, and such folks, tell us, No great analogy between Greatness and...
Pàgina xviii - But without considering Newgate as no other than human nature with its mask off, which some very shameless writers have done, a thought which no price should purchase me to entertain, I think we may be excused for suspecting, that the splendid palaces of the great are often no other than Newgate with the mask on.
Pàgina 38 - To think those greater who're above us; Another instance of my glory, Who live above you, twice two story, And from my garret can look down On the whole street of Arlington.
Pàgina 40 - GREAT Sir, as on each levee day I still attend you — still you say I'm busy now, to-morrow come ; To-morrow, sir, you're not at home. So says your porter, and dare I Give such a man as him the lie ? In imitation, sir, of you, I keep a mighty levee too ; Where my attendants, to their sorrow, Are bid to come again to-morrow. To-morrow they return, no doubt, And then like you, sir, I'm gone out.
Pàgina 201 - Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil ; that put darknefs for light, and light for darknefs ; that put bitter for fweet, and fweet for bitter.
Pàgina 243 - Some Papers proper to be read before the Royal Society, concerning the Terrestrial Chrysipus, Golden-Foot or Guinea; an Insect, or Vegetable, resembling the Polypus, which hath this surprising Property, that being cut into several Pieces, each Piece becomes a perfect Animal, or Vegetable, as complete as that of which it was originally only a Part. Collected by Petrus Gualterus, but not published till after his Death.
Pàgina 43 - All coflce-houses, and their praters ; All courts of justice, and debaters ; All taverns, and the sots within 'em ; All bubbles and the rogues that skin 'em.

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