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not considering the Duty of his Allegiance, but having withdrawn his due Obedience from her faid lace Majesty, did at several times, in the said Years of our Lord 1710, 17!1, and 1712, falsely, maliciously, wickedly, and traicerously aid, help, asist, and adhere to the said Duke of Anjou, then an Enemy to her faid late Majesty, and against her said Majesty, and in Execution and Performance of his faid aiding, helping, aflifting, and adhering, and in Confederacy and Combination with the then Enemies of her late Majesty, and with divers other wicked and evil.difpos'd Persons, did at several times, in the years aforesaid, advise and counsel the Enemies of her late Majesty against her faid Majesty ; and in such counselling and advising, did concert with them, and did promote the yielding and giving up Spain and the Weft-Indies, or some Part thereof, to the said Duke of Anjou, then in Enmity with her Majesty, against the Duty of his Allegiance, and the Laws and Statutes of this Realm.

All which Crimes and Misdemeanors, were committed and done by him the faid Henry Viscount Boling broke aa gainst our late Sovereign Lady the Queen, her Crown and Dignity, the Peace and Interest of this Kingdom, and in Breach of the several Trusts repos’d in him the said Vif., count, and he the faid Henry Viscount Boling broke, was one of her Majesty's Principal Secretaries of Scate, and one of her Privy Council, during the Time that all and every the Crimes before set forth, were done and commitred.

For which Matters and Things, the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses of the House of Commons in Parliamene assembled, do, in the Name of themselves, and of all the Commons of Great Britain, impeach the faid Henry Viscount Boling broke of High Treason, and other High Crimes and Misdemeanors in the said Articles contains ; and the said Commons, by Protestation faving to themfelves the Liberty of exhibiting, at any Time hereafter, any other Accusations or Impeachments against the said Henry Viscount Boling broke, and also of replying to the Answers which the said Henry Viscount Boling broke shall make to the Premisses, or any of them, or to any Impeachment or Accufation, that shall be by them exhibited, according to the Course and Proceedings of Parliament, do pray, that the said Henry Viscount Boling broke, be put to answer all and every the Premisses; and that such Proceedings, Examinations, Trials, and Judgments may be upon them, and every of them, had and used, as shall be agreeable to Law and Justice : And they do further pray and demand, that the faid Henry Viscount Boling broke, may be fequeftred from Parliament, and forthwith committed to safe Custody.

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The fame Day, Aug. 6. the Lords fent a Message to acquaint the Commons, that their Lordships had order'd Henry Viscount Boling broke to be forthwith attach'd, by the Gentleman Ulher of the Black-Rod attending the House of Lords, and brought to their Lordships Bar, to answer the Arricles exbibiced against him by the House of Cammons: But the Lord Bolingbroke had long before consulted for his Safety by retiring into France. As to the Duke of Ormond, the Night between the zoth and 21st of July, he went from his House at Richmond, accompany'd only by one Renauld, his Confectioner; and embarking privately on board a Veffel, on the coast of Kent, a few Days after landed in France.

On the 8th of Aug 157, the ingrassed Articles against his Grace were read, upon which it was order'd, ift, that Mr. Secretary Stanhope do carry the faid Articles to the Lords; adly, that Mr. Secretary Stanhope be directed, before he exhibits the faid Articles to the Lords, to im. peach James Duke of Ormond to the fame Effect, and in the fame Form, as was before recited, in Relation to Henry Viscount Boling broke : Which Mr. Secretary did, the same Day, accordingly. The Articles against his Grace are as follows: Articles of Impeachment of High Treason, and other High Crimes

and Misdemeanours, against James Duke of Ormond. Art. I. HAT whereas fames Duke of Ormond, in or

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about the Month of April 1712, being appointed General of the Forces in the Netherlands of her late Majesty Queen Anne, with Orders to profecute the War againit France with all poflible Vigour, in Conjunction with her faid Majesty's Allies; and having, by her faid Majefty's Directions, and in her Name, given her faid Allies the most folemn Assurances to that Purpose, was thereupon admitred into the Counsels, and made privy to the most fecret Designs of the Generals of the Confederate Army against the conmon Enemy, and of the Measures they thought most proper to carry on the War with Success; and whereas, in the Year 1712, the faid War was carry'd on berween her said lace Majesty and the said French King, and during all the faid Year the War did continue, and

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for all that time the said French King and his Subjects were Enemies of her late Majesty, he the said James Duke of Ormond, then General of her Majesty's Army, and a Subject of her Majesty, not considering the Ducy of his Allegiance, but having withdrawn his true and due Obedience fron her faid late Majesty, and Affections from his Country, did, during the said War, falfly, maliciously, wickedly, and traiterously aid, help, aflist, and adhere to the said French King, against her said lace Majesty; and in Execution of his faid aiding, helping, and adhering, maliciously, falsly, and traiterously, contrary to the Duty of his Allegiance, and the Laws and Starutes of this Realm, did, on or about the 26th of May 15,12, fend private Intelligence and Information to

Marmal Villars, then an Enemy to her faid late Majesty, and General of the French King's Army, against her Majesty and her Allies, of a ·March the Army of her said late Majesty and her Allies was then going to make, and of the Designs of the faid Army in making the March,

Art. II. That whereas in or about the Month of May 1712, a traiterous Design was carry'd on between Henry St. Fohn Esq; one of her said late Majesty's principal secreraries of State, and other evil-disposed Persons, and the Ministers of France, to defeat the just Expectations of the great Advantages over the common Enemy, her Majesty and the Nation had the reason to hope for, from the greač Superiority of the Confederate Forces in the Netherlands, ro obrain which, very large Sums of Money had been cheerfully given by the Parliament; and to that End, the said Henry St. John had given secret Assurances to the French Ministers, that her Majesty's General in the Netherlands (tho under the most folemn Engagements to act vigorously in concert with the Allies) should not act againft France; and had also engaged the said James Duke of Ormond, to concur in the said wicked Purposes; which evil Practices of the said Henry St. John and others, when they were first fuspected, giving the greatest Alarm to the Minds of the Allies, to the Parliament, and to the whole Kingdom, and being thereupon openly disavowed by all the Confpifacors in the most publick Manner; he che faid James Duke of Ormond, in order to disguise, and conceal from ber faid late Majesty, and the whole Kingdom, the faid traiterous Designs then carry'd on by the said Henry St. folm, and other false Traitors to her Majesty and their Country, in Aid and Comfort of the French King, then in open War with, and an Enemy of her said late Majesty,

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did, by his Leiter of the 25th of May 1712, to the faid Henry St. John, then her Majesty's principal Secretary of Stare, calld his publick Letter, because prepared and intended to be read before her faid Majesty and her Council, wickedly, falsly, and treacherously abuse and impose upon her said Majesty and her Council, by affirming and declaring therein, that if he found an'Opportunity to bring the Enemy to a Batele, he should not decline it, alcho' by a private Letter writ by the faid James Duke of Ormond, of che fame Date, and to the faid Henry St. Johan, designed to be read to the said Henry St. John and the Conspirators only, he the faid James Duke of Ormond, did, on che contrary, wickedlg promise and engage, that he would noc attack or molest the French Army, or engage in any siege against Frar.ce.

Art. III. That he the said James Duke of Ormond, in or about the Month of June 1912, being at that Time General of her Majesty's Forces against France, and a Subject of her Majesty, not considering the Duty of his Allegiance, but having alcogether withdrawn the cordial Love and 'due Abedience which every faithful Subject owed to her faid Majesty, and devoting himself to the Service of France, and designing to give Aid and Comfort to the Trench King and his Subjects, then in open War with, and Enemies to her said late Majesty, in Violation of the inany Treaties of Alliance between Great Britain and reveral other. Princes and States, for carrying on the War against France, and of the said Instructions to him on or about the 7th of April 1712, under the sign·Manual, in Pursuance thereof, and of the folemn Declaration he had Put lately before, by her faid Majesty's Command, and in lier Name, made to the Pensionary of Holland, and the Geperals of the Confederate Army, to push on the War with all possille Vigour : And also in open and manifest Vio. Jacion of the last Order, sent him by a Letter from the faid Heriry St. John, on or about the 7th of June 1752, whereby the faid james Duke of Ormond was directed to make no Ceflation of Arms with the French, unless the Ar. ticles demanded by her Majesty, and exprefly mention'd and set down in the said Letter for the said Cessation, fhould be comply'd with by France; and whereby he the faid fames Duke of Ormond, was likewise further ex presly directed and told, that in case the Conditions therein mentioned were not comply'd with by France; thac then he was entirely free from Restraint, and at Liberty to take all reasonable Measures in his Power, for'annoying the Enemy, and at full Liberty of acting against France, did,

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on or about the 25th of June aforefaid, falsiy, maliciously, wickedly, and traiterously aid, help, aslist, and adhere to the French King, against her faid late Majesty, and then in open War with her Majesty : And in Execution of the faid aiding and affifting, belping and adhering to, and in Pursuance of a wicked Promise he had secretly made the fame Day to Mareschal Villars, General of the French Army, to that purpose, maliciously, falfly, and traiteroufly, contrary to the Duty of his Allegiance, and the Laws and Statutes of this Realm, did advise and endeavour to persuade the Generals of the Confederate Army against France, and the Deputies of the States-General, to raise the Siege of Quesnoy, a French Town then besieg'd by them; and did then further traiterously and wickedly refuse to act any longer against France; and then also traiterously and wick. edly told the said Generals of the said Confederate Army, and the said States Deputies, that he could no longer cover the Siege of Quesnoy, but was obliged by his Instructions to march off with the Queen's Troops, and chofe in her Majesty's Pay: Whereas in Truth, and the Commons expresly charge, that he the said James Duke of Ormond, did traiterously and wickedly make the faid Declaration, and refused to act against France, in manifcft contradi&tion, not only to his original Orders, but also of the said Letter to him of the 7th of June, from the faid Henry St. John, since none of the Articles demanded by her Majesty for a Ceffation of Arms, and express?d in the said Letrer to be the Condition without which no Cellation of Arms was to be made, had been comply'd with by the French. And in further Execution of his said traiterous Designs, he the fsid James Duke of Ormond, by a Letter to the faid MarDual Vilars, on the 24th of June aforesaid, did trairerously, and wickedly send Intelligence to the faid Marshal Vil lars of the before mencioned Palliges, between the faid James Duke of Ormond, and the Generals of the Confederate Army, and the States Deputies; and how his Propofitions were received by them; and also of the Disposition he observ'd in the foreign Troops to adhere to the faid Confederates in Case of a Separation by the Troops of Great Britain,

Art. IV. That he the said James Duke of Ormond, did not only wickedly, and fully affirm to the Generals of the Confederate Army, and the States Deputies, that his Refusal to act any longer against France, and to cover the Siege of Quesnoy was in Pursuance of the Instructions he. had received for char Purpose ; but allo to induce che said

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