Imatges de pÓgina
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dear young friends, of Lying.Imitate "THE LITTLE BOY THAT COULD NOT TELL A LIE."

"When George Washington was about six years old, some one made him a present of a hatchet; of which, like most children, he was very fond. He went about chopping every thing that came in his way. Going into the garden he cut an English cherry tree, so much that there was but little hope that the tree would live. The next morning his father saw the tree, which was great favorite, in that condition, and enquired who it was that had been so mischievous. He declared that he would not have taken 40 rupees for that tree. No one could tell him who had cut the cherry tree. Presently after George came with his batchet in his hand. George, said his father, do you know who killed that beautiful little cherry tree yonder in the garden. The child was silent for a moment, and then nobly replied, " I cannot tell a lie, Papa. You know I cannot tell a lie. I did cut it with my hatchet. Run to my arms! my boy, crid his father. Run to my arms. Glad am I George that you killed my cherry tree, for you have paid me for it

a thousand fold! Such an act of greatness in my son, is of more worth than a thousand cherry trees, though blossomed of silver and their fruits of gold."* Go, my children, imitate George Washington. Never tell a lieGod is one that cannot lie, and he will bless those that love the truth.

* See Evan. Mag, for 1813, page 100.

A HYMN.

A HYMN.

Against Lying.

O'tis a lovely thing for youth,
To walk betimes in wisdom's way;
To fear a lie, to speak the truth,
That we may trust to all they say.

But liars we can never trust,
[true;
Though they should speak the thing that's
For he that does one fault at first

And lies to hide it, makes it two.

The Lord delights in them that speak
The words of truth; but ev'ry liar
Must have his portion in the lake
That burns with brimstone and with fire.

Then let me always watch my lips,
Lest I be struck to death and hell,
For God a book of reck'ning keeps
For ev'ry lie that Children tell.

Watts.

LECTURE

JACOB'S DREAM.

GEN. 28. 12. And he dreamed and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven and behold the Angels of God ascending and descending on

it.

YOU have heard how and in what ma nner Jacob obtained the blessing. Now you shall hear some of the consequences of his sinful deception. His brother Esau was so angry that he threatened to kill him. And Esau hated Jacob, because of the blessing wherewith his Father blessed him: and Esau said in his heart, the days of mourning for my father are at hand; then will I slay my brother Jacob. And these words of Esau, her eldest son, were told to Rebekah: and she sent and called Jacob her younger son, and said unto him, Behold, thy brother Esau, as touching thee, doth comfort himself, proposing to kill thee. Now therefore, my son, obey my voice, and arise, fee thou to Laban, my brother,

brother, to Haram; and tarry with him a few days, until thy brother's anger turni away from thee, and he forget that which thou hast done unto him: then I will send and fetch thee from thence why should I be deprived also of you both in one day.

Here we see some of the bitter fruits of Rebe kah's bad plan. She must part with her belov ed Jacob, in order to save his life. Instead of a few days, Jacob was 20 years with Laban, and Rebekah never saw him again in this world.. Esau's hatred to Jacob was like that of Cain's to Abel, he hated him because God loved him. Nothing could comfort Esau but the hope of murder, and as Isaac had talked of dying, he thought his father could not live much longer, and it was not worth while to grieve his father, when he had but a few days to live. That Isaac would soon be dead, and then Jacob's murder would be no grief to him. It seems he not only thought this in his heart, but had been heard to say what he would do to Jacob, and his words were told to his mo. ther, for whom he appears to have had no regard. If Jacob had been slain by his brother, Esau's life was also forfeited by the laws of God,

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