Imatges de pÓgina
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their poor Monk not necessarily a priest — Benedictines rise at four; are at church an hour and half; at church again half an hour before, half an hour after, dinner; and again from half an hour after seven to eight They may sleep eight hours Bodily labour wanted in monasteries The poor taken into hospitals, and miserably kept-Monks in the convent fifteen: accounted poor.

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Thursday, Oct. 12. -We went to the Gobelins

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Tapestry makes a good picture — imitates flesh exactly

one piece with a gold ground — the birds not exactly coloured Thence we went to the king's cabinet; very neat, not, perhaps, perfect — gold ore — candles of the candle-tree-seeds- woods-Thence to Gagnier's (') house, where I saw rooms nine, furnished with a profusion of wealth and elegance which I never had seen before vases -pictures- the dragon china - The lustre is said to be of crystal, and to have cost 3,500l. The whole furniture said to have cost 125,000l. Damask hangings covered with pictures Porphyry — This house struck me. Then we waited on the ladies to Monville's - Captain Irwin with us (2)—Spain < County towns all beggars-At Dijon he could not find 6 the to Orleansway Cross roads of France bad very ( -Five soldiers - - Woman ·Soldiers escaped The 'colonel would not lose five men for the death of one - The magistrate cannot seize a soldier but by ⚫ the colonel's permission-Good inn at Nismes-Moors

woman

' of Barbary fond of Englishmen Gibraltar eminently

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healthy; it has beef from Barbary — There is a large garden Soldiers sometimes fall from the rock.'

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Friday, Oct. 13. — I stayed at home all day, only

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(1) Perhaps Gagny, Intendant des Finances, who had a fine house in the Rue de Varennes. — C.

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(2) The rest of this paragraph appears to be a minute of what was told by Captain Irwin. · B. And is therefore marked as quotation.

. C.

went to find the prior, who was not at home. I read something in Canus (1) — Nec admiror, nec multum laudo.

66 Saturday, Oct. 14. We went to the house of M. [D'] Argenson, which was almost wainscotted with looking-glasses, and covered with gold - The ladies' closet wainscotted with large squares of glass over painted paper -They always place mirrors to reflect their

rooms.

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"Then we went to Julien's (2), the treasurer of the clergy-30,000l. a year—The house has no very large room, but is set with mirrors, and covered with goldBooks of wood here, and in another library.

“ At D********'s (3) I looked into the books in the lady's closet, and in contempt showed them to Mr. T[hrale] Prince Titi (4); Bibl. des Fées,' and other

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(1) Melchior Canus, a celebrated Spanish Dominican, who died at Toledo, in 1560. He wrote a treatise "De Locis Theologicis," in twelve books. - B.- He was celebrated for the beauty of his Latinity: "Melchior Canus parlait Latin comme Ciceron."- Vigneul-Marvilliana, vol. i. p. 161. — C.

(2) M. de St. Julien, Receveur-général du Clergé. — C. (3) D'Argenson's. — C.

(4) The History of Prince Titi was said to be the autobiography of Frederick Prince of Wales, but was probably written by Ralph, his secretary. See Park's Roy. and Nob. Auth., vol. i. p. 171.; and Biog. Dict., art. Ralph, where it is added, that Ralph's executor gave up the unpublished MS. of Prince Titi to Lord Bute.-C.-[It is possible that the original MS. was so given up, but the book had been undoubtedly printed, both in French and English-in Paris in 1735, and in London 1736. The work was probably exhibited purposely on the lady's table, in the expectation that her English visitors would think it a literary curiosity; which, indeed, it has proved to be; for Dr. Johnson seems not to have known what it was, and some modern critics have even denied the very existence of the volume; which, however, I have had in my possession. It was advertised in the Gent. Mag. for Feb. 1736, as "History of Prince Titi, a Royal Allegory, translated from the original, just published in Paris: By the Hon. Mrs. Stanly: sold by E. Curl; price 3s."-C. 1835.]

books — She was offended, and shut up, as we heard afterwards, her apartment.

"Then we went to Julien le Roy, the king's watchmaker, a man of character in his business, who showed a small clock made to find the longitude. A decent

man.

"Afterwards we saw the Palais Marchand () and the courts of justice, civil and criminal- Queries on the Sellette (2) This building has the old Gothic passages, and a great appearance of antiquity. Three hundred prisoners sometimes in the gaol.

"Much disturbed; hope no ill will be. (3)

"In the afternoon I visited Mr. Freron the journalist. He spoke Latin very scantily, but seemed to understand me. His house not splendid, but of commodious size. His family, wife, son, and daughter, not elevated, but decent. I was pleased with my reception. He is to translate my books, which I am to send him with

notes.

66 Sunday, Oct. 15. At Choisi, a royal palace on the banks of the Seine, about 7 m. from Paris. The terrace noble along the river. The rooms numerous and

(1) It was not quite correct to apply the name of Palais Marchand to the whole of that vast building called generally the Palais, which from being the old palace of the kings of France had (like our own palace of Westminster) become appropriated to the sittings of the parliament and the courts of justice; and the Conciergerie of that palace (like the Gate-house of ours) became a prison. The Palais Marchand was properly only the stalls (like what are now called bazaars) which were placed along some of the galleries and corridors of the Palais. C.

(2) The sellette was a stool on which the criminal sat while he was interrogated by the court. This is what Johnson means by "queries."-C.

(3) This passage, which so many think superstitious, reminds me of "Archbishop Laud's Diary." - B.-It, perhaps, had no superstitious meaning. He felt, it would seem, his mind dis turbed, and may naturally have been apprehensive of becoming worse. - C.

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grand, but not discriminated from other palaces. chapel beautiful, but small China globes tables - labyrinth - – sinking table (1) — toilet tables. "Monday, Oct. 16.- The Palais Royal very grand, large, and lofty A very great collection of pictures three of Raphael two Holy Family piece of M Argelo-one room of Rubens the pictures of Raphael fine.

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"The Thuilleries Statues Venus Æn. and Anchises in his arms- Nilus-many more The walks not open to mean persons-Chairs at night hired for two sous a piece - Pont tournant. (2)

"Austin Nuns (3) — Grate Mrs. Fermor, abbess - She knew Pope, and thought him disagreeable Mrs. has many books—has seen life - Their frontlet disagreeable · Their hood Their life easy Rise about five; hour and half in chapel - Dine at ten Another hour and half in chapel; half an hour about three, and half an hour more at seven four hours in chapel- A large garden Thirteen pensioners (4) — Teachers complained.

"At the Boulevards saw nothing, yet was glad to be there Rope-dancing and farce - Egg dance - N. B. Near Paris, whether on week-days or Sundays, the roads empty.

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(1) A round table, the centre of which descended by machinery to a lower floor; so that supper might be served and removed without the presence of servants. It was invented by Louis XV. during the favour of Madame du Barri. — C.

(2) Before the revolution, the passage from the garden of the Thuilleries into the Place Louis XV. was over a pont tournant, a kind of drawbridge. — C.

(3) The English convent of Notre Dame de Sion, of the order of St. Augustine, situated in the Rue des Fossés St. Victor.-C.

°C.

(4) Young ladies, who paid for their education. Before the revolution, there were no boarding schools, and all young ladies were educated in the convents.

"Tuesday, Oct. 17. bought

A snuff box

- At the Palais Marchand I

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24 livres.

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15

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[Livres] 63-21. 12s. 6d. sterling.

"We heard the lawyers plead―N. As many killed at Paris as there are days in the year— Chambre de question (1) Tournelle at the Palais Marchand (2)—– An old venerable building.

"The Palais Bourbon, belonging to the Prince of Condé-Only one small wing shown — lofty - splendid — gold and glass — The battles of the great Condé are painted in one of the rooms - The present prince a grandsire at thirty-nine. (3)

"The sight of palaces, and other great buildings, leaves no very distinct images, unless to those who talk of them -As I entered, my wife was in my mind (4); she would have been pleased. Having now nobody to please, I am little pleased.

“Ñ. B. In France there is no middle rank. (5)

(1) This was one of the rooms of the Conciergerie, where la question- — torture — was applied. — C.

(2) The word Tournelle designated that portion of the parliament of Paris which tried criminal causes, and that part of the Palais in which they sat. — C.

(3) The grandson was the celebrated and unfortunate Duke d'Enghien, born in 1775, murdered in 1804. The father, "restes infortuneés du plus beau sang du monde," still lives under his former title of Duc de Bourbon.-C. 1830. He died in Aug. 1830, under most melancholy circumstances. - C. 1835.

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(4) His tender affection for his departed wife, of which there are many evidences in his "Prayers and Meditations," appears very feelingly in this passage.

(5) This observation, which Johnson afterwards repeats, was unfounded in the sense in which he appears to have understood it. France was, in theory, divided (as England is) into the

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