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THE

SENATOR:

OR,

Parliamentary Chronicle.

CONTAINING

AN IMPARTIAL REGISTER:

RECORDING, WITH THE UTMOST ACCURACY, THE

PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES

OF THE HOUSES OF

LORDS AND COMMONS.

Being the THIRD SESSION in the

Eighteenth Parliament of Great-Britain:

Held in the Year 1798.

FORMING A SOURCE OF

POLITICAL INFORMATION,

HIGHLY INTERESTING TO EVERY BRITISH SUBJECT.

VOL. XXII.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR J. STRATFORD, No. 112, HOLBORN-HILL;
H. D. SYMONDS, No. 20, PATERNOSTER-Row;

AND SOLD BY ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS

IN GREAT BRITAIN AND.

IRELAND.

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HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Tuesday, January 22.

Mr. Secretary Dundas brought up a Meffage from his Majefty, to the fame effect as that in the Houfe of Lords, and moved that the meffage be taken into confideration to

morrow.

Mr. Sheridan faid, that when the motion came under
consideration, he must take it for granted that an Address
would be moved to his Majefty affuring him that the Houfe
would proceed immediately with the fubject. If this should
really be the courfe the Right Hon. Gentleman would
purfue, he did not know how otherwife he could perform
his duty but by oppofing it. He must think fuch a measure
not only unwife and impolitic at this time, but one replete
with mifchief. But with refpect to the fentiments expre Ted
generally in his Majefty's Meffage, he was fure no Mem-
ber of that Houfe, or of the community, more cordially
concurred in them. He was particularly anxious that no
opportunity fhould be mifimproved for the benefit of the
two countries, and wifhed the connection between them
might be perpetuated. His objection was not to the fug-
geflion thrown out, that it is neceflary to take fuch fteps as
may fecure and perpetuate the connection between the two
counties, but only to the propofal for agitating the difcuffion
in fuch hafte; and under the impreflion that it was intended.
to proceed immediately to the difcuilion of the topics em-
braced in the Meffage, he must fay he fhould think it necef-
fary to arrest the progrefs of fuch meafures. He was con-
vinced it was the common feeling and wifh of that House
(and he hoped of this country) that fuch meafures may be
purfued as may lead to reftore cordial harmony between the
two countries; but to difcufs any points of Union now,
might be fatal to the profperity, perhaps the exiftence of
both. It was in fact, one of a feries which had but too long
been purfued; however, as he most undoubtedly thought it
neceffary that the independence of Ireland fhould be af-
ferted and maintained againit every kind of enemy, he was
not adverfe to the adoption of every falutary precaution
against the difturbers of its repofe. But it happened to him
to think that immediately to agitate any difcuffion, fuch as
that pointed to by the Meffage, was not to make the most
falutary effort to guarantee the independence or increase the
happiness of Ireland. While, therefore, he would chearfully
join in an Addrefs to his Majefty, thanking him for his gra-
cious communication, he muft oppofe the taking any pre-

cipitate

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