Imatges de pÓgina
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233

, Remarks on a late Defence of Mr. Unhappy Situation of the Slaves at Locke's Opinion concerning personal Berbice

251 Identity

227 History of Party, during the present Defence of the Character of Charles I. Reign

252 in Answer to some late Strictures 228 Magna Charta, a History of

255 Affecting History of Lucy Miranda 229 Description of the Tallow Tree, and Uncommon Instance of the Divine In- Method of preparing the Tallow terposition

231
from it

256 The Argument of Warburton's Divine Planet Venus described

ibid. Legation of Mofes, analysed 232 History and Description of Asia ibid. Atronomical Problem

ibid. Christ's Resurrection Body farther conHistory of Infelicia

lidered

259 Various Modes of obtaining Benefices Esay on the Natural Liberty of Man. in the Church explained 235 kind

260 Moral Observations on Capital Punith | An Impartial Review of New Pub. 262 mients

237

History and Adventures of an Farther Strictures on the Characters of Atom

ibid. Charles I.

239
History of Paraguay

263 A Defence of the Confesional 240

Of the Infuence of Languages Meditations on a Tea-pot

241
on Opinions

265 Different Sentiments on the Resurrec- POETICAL ESSAYS

269 tion

242

List of the Minority and Majority 270 Considerations on the Act against pro. The MONTHLY CHRONOLOGER 272 phane Swearing

Marriages and Births; Deaths

277 Letters to, and Proceedings of, the

Ecclefiaftical Prefermente ibid. Benevolent Society 246 Foreign Affairs

ibid. Latin Version of a Símile in Addison's Promotions Civil and Military ibid. Campaiga

250 Stocks, Grain,Wind, and Weather 226 With a fine PORTRAIT of that great Patriot PASCAL PAOLI, GENERAL OF THE BRAVE CORSICANS,

Engraved by MILLER, from Mr. C. Bowles's Mezzotinto. LONDON: Printed for R. BALDWIN, at No. 47, in Pater-nofter Row; of whom may be bad, compleat Sets, from the Year 1732, to this time, neatly bound' or

Atitched, or any angle Month to complete Sets.

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PRICES of STOCKS, &c. in M A Y, 1769. Sov. Sea., Old S.S New S. S.1.3 per C. 3 per C.13 per C.13 } per C. 4 por C. 14. per. C./ 4 per C.In. Bond. Long. | Lottery Wind Weather Stock Ann. Ann, reduced confol.

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27 14 17 N. E. fair 103

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CHARLES CORBETT, at No. 30, facing St. Dunstar's Church, Fleet-Street, STOCK-BROXIR, who buys and sells in the Stocks

by Commission, and transacts the Lottery Businefs as usual.
Mark-Lane Exchange Reading Bafingfloke. Farnham. Henley Cambridge. York. Gloucester. Hereford. Monmouth.

London.
Wheat 306. od. to 365. gl. to ul. gl. od to sol. 91. os. to 131. 121 os load 328 to 34 9r. 205 to 34 qu 59 060 bushel ss 6d burg1g 5s bush.iogal Hay per load 275. to jos.
Barley 128. od. to 18s.
15ø, to 20$. 138. to 16s.

158. to 18s, od. 148 to 22 gr 15% to 16 178 to 21 O 38 od to 3s 3d 06 od to 46 od 48 2d to 46 4d Straw from 14s. to 19%. Oate ris. od. to 140. 145. to 209, 163. to 18s.

149. to 16, 141 od to 22 125 to 14 1 29 to 15 39 to 38 d2s 6d to os od 28 4dtozsosa Coals 44.5. per cha,

to 35 8dles od to as od os od toga od) Hops al. to 21, Gube

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Τ Η Ε

LONDON MAGAZINE,

For MA Y, 1769.

To tbe Author of a Defence of Mr. Locke's whatever suffers a change, becomes,

Opinis» concerning Personal Identity; a different thing from what it was. in Answer to the firsi Part of a late Consequently, if personal identity conElaj on that Subject.

fists in consciousness, this identity con. SIR,

sists in what does not remain the N your defence of Mr. Same; or, in other words, personal

Locke's opinion of per- identity consists in diversity. How difI

fonal identity, you, ferent from this opinion of Mr. Locke in (p. 39.). condemn was that of the author of plalm 102, his definition of the who addressing the Creator of the uniword person. This to verse, thus expresses himself. “ Thou,

me seems very unac- Lord, in the beginning haft laid the countable, who am not able to con- foundation of the earth; and the ceive how Mr. Locke's opinion of per- heavens are the work of thy hands. sonal identity can be right, if his opi. They Thall perish, but thou shalt énnion of person be wrong. According to 'dure; they all shali wax old as doth a you, Mr. Locke's opinion of personal garment, and as a vesture shalt thou identity is an opinion of the identity change them, and they shall be change of what is not a person : you never- ed, but thou art the same.Here we theless call yourself a defender of Mr. find an inspired wiiter declaring the Locke's opinion of personal identity identity/of the supreme Spirit to conagainst an antagonist whose very inge: fist in immutability. rious and subtle arguments are levelled In p. 22 of your defence you quote a Mr. Locke's opinion of the identity from the minute philosopher what the of what Mr. Locke calls a person. author calls a demonstration against

In the appendix to your desence, Locke's opinion. This famous demonftrayou tell us that the word person, accord. tion is, you say, egregious, trifling, and ing to the received sense in all classic may safely be trusted witb the reader, cal authors, stands for a guise, charac. I readily agree with Bishop Berkeley, ter, quality, mask. But, alas! person, that what he calls a demonstration according to this definition, will not against Locke, really is such. I reaanswer your purpose, for none of these dily agree with you, that this demonthings have consciousness. Permit me stration may safely be trusted with the to advise you to be reconciled to your reader ; let me add, that it would be friend, who calls that invisible being a very unsafe for you to attempt to anperson, of which person or guise is swer it. only a sign. The figure is very com

It was

a favourite tenet of Mr. monly used by which we call the thing Locke, that the soul does not always fignified by name of its character or think, and this opinion you likewise fign. Thus Mr. Locke defines person undertake to patronize; but it may be to be a thinking, intelligent being, that has asked how you can reconcile this doce reason, refle&ion, &c. And it is the opi- trine with what you advance at the nion of this great man that the identity foot of p. 32? where I find this asser. of this being consists in consciousness. tion, Time unperceived is no time, ab.

But against this opinion there lies solute time is a mere fiction. I will take a mighty objection. Every person finds, it for granted that, when the soul by experience, that his consciousness perceives time, it thinks; but, accorda undergoes a perpetual change; now ing to you, there is no time, unless the

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