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ly sufficient to fit him for the cases of suffering for conscience
rest which remains for the people sake." It is composed of Friends
of God. That, I doubt not, was under the name of correspondents
his own idea. His dying words residing in or near the ciiy, who
appear to me to express a cheer. are chosen by the Quarterly
ful expectation of awakening from Meetings in the several coun-
the sleep of death to an everlasting ties, out of a list of names selected
life. If any can doubt of this, I by the elders and orerseers of the
would refer them to the habitual several Monthly Meetings in Lon.
state of bis mind, expressed in don. These “ elders and overseers
several of his letters, written in are to meet together annually and
the closing scenes of his life, which make a list of such Friends' naines,
Mr. Belsham has annexed to his as shall be by them approved for
Memoirs of Mr, Lindsey. Some this service, and leave the said
quotations from these would be list with the clerk of the Meeting
edifying to your readers, and for Sufferings, for the information
might convince Scrutator of his of the Friends in the country.
mistake : and I could almost hope The same meetings also appoint
they would cure Messrs. Bogue members of their own in the coun.
and Bennet of their bigotry; or, try as correspondents, who are to
at least, make them ashamed of attend as occasions shall require.
their gross reflections.

The names of all these correspon."
I remain

dents previously to their being re-
Respecifully yours,

corded as such, are submitted to H. P. the approbation of the Yearly

Meeting. Such men as are apMr. Harrison's Letter to the proved ministers, wherever they

Quakers, on Mr. Wyrill's Pe- may reside, are also members of the tition.

Meeting for Sufferings, which as a

standing Committee of the Yearly Sir, August 10, 1812. Meeting is intrusted with “a gen. The following letter, from a most eral care of whatever may arise respectable member of the Society during the intervals of that meet. of Friends, appears to me well ing affecting the Society, and redeserving a place in your Journal, quiring immediate attention : parand as I imagine most of your ticularly of those circumstances readers are unacquainted with the which may occasion an applica. constitution of the body to whom tion to government." it was addressed at so seasonable a Such is the constitution of the time, and in so impressive a man. meetiug which declined to take ner, however the ill.success of any part in opposing Lord Sid. such an appeal is to be accounted mouth's Bill, on the selfish plea for, I will give a brief account of that it did not contain any thing its origin, &c.

which particularly affected Friends, In the year 1675, a time of very and on whom as a collective body severe persecution, the Yearly Mr. Harrison's letter appears to Meeting in London appointed a have made no impression. How Meeting to be held in that city, is such an apparent relinquish. in order “to advise and assist in ment of the generous feelings and

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noble principles of their predeces, and bigotry, which ought not to sors to be explained ? Does this exist in the code of a Christian mecting, in so perseveringly for- country, and ibe force of which bearing to emulate their example, is only repressed by the leniency truly exhibit the general sense of the times; but whilst they do the society they représent? I be- exist the monster of persecution lieve noi, and may at some future may be rather said to be dormant time offer you my reasons for think than to be defunci. ing so, provided no person better Many Friends, doubtless, may qualified should take up the sub. be disposed to make their minds ject. It ought to be understood easy on the subject, if no new whether such marked supineness enactments affecung the society, is the real character of the Society, and of an off-nsive nalure take or only of those who are at pre- place; but such Friends must have sent its representatives, chosen read the history of the society out of a list prepared as above with very little attention, if they mentioned by the elders and over- bave not perceived that our pre. seers of London, in secret conclave decessors were zealously affected, assembled.

not only for the interests of the so. AMICUS. ciety particularly, but also for

the interests of Christianity gene. To the Meeting for Sufferings, to rally, by being the undauoted ad.

be held the 1st of 5th Month, vocates of religious liberij; and 1812.

it is for such Friends to consider DEAR FRIENDS,

how far they are discharging their I do not wish to obtrude upon duty by confining their views to your attention a matter of slight present ease and accommodation, moment, but there is a subject at a juncture when the exertions now before the Commons House of all those who are on the side of of Parliament, and likely soon to virtue and truth are peculiarly come, before the Upper House, called for. by way of petition, which at. The worthy and respoclable taches most closely to the princi• character who bas taken ibe must ples of the society, as they were active part in bringing this subject zealously professed and acted before the view of Parliament, I upon by our ancient Friends. I mean Christopher Wyvill, is anxi. mean the subject of universal to- ous to obtain the co-operation of leration, or perfect liberty of con. sincere-hearted Christians of every science in matters of religion, for denomination, and from the which our ancestors, almost ex. known principles of the suciety, clusively among the people of is willing to reckon upon that of these realms, and under the hea. Friends. In one of the commu. viest temporal discouragements, nications lately received from him, contended.

he expresses himself thus: “Your No Friend, acquainted with the predecessors 'ie past times, were statute books, will say, that there long the only avowed advocates are not many acts trenching upon for liberty of conscience in these the rights of conscience, and countries. At least the honouraformed in the times of darkness ble exceptions in other classes of Christians were few indeed. Their responding solicitude attends my doctrine, in this respect, is now mind tha: his expectation may avowed and pressed upon Parlia- not be disappointed. ment by Christians of every other Hlaving now relieved my mind, denomination. It is not the time, by sischarging what I have cons I think, when your benevolent cived to be my duty on the subsect will perseveringly refuse their ject in tbis department, a subject concurrence.

Oiher considera- which I deem of higher moment tions will give way to the sense of to the civil and religious well. duty; and the example of our being of the inbibitants of this virtuous supporter of the rights of country, and of human society in conscience, after a few equally general, than any thing that has virtuous, "qually consistent friends, engaged the public attention in bave joined him, will be followed modern times, I refer it 10 your by the rest of his Christian com- serious and deliberate considera. munity."

tion, and in so doing I have no What an honourable testimony motive, I can have no motive but is i his, in these more enlightened what respects universal goud. to times, to the principles and con. promote which is the sincere wish duct of our ancient Friends. Such of your respectful friend, is the solicitude of tbis good man, GEORGE HARRISON. that our society should not give away their crown, or desert the West Hill, Wandsworth, standard which our early Friends 27th, 4th Month, 1812. su consistently set up, and a cor

POETRY.

VERSES ON SEEING (p. 333.) TAE CONSOLATIONS OF UNIVER.

SAL RESTORATION," WRITTEN AT READING.
Midst scenes where zeal, by Calvin's lore inspir'd,
The Christian's God, in wrath, had long attired,
Wrath, ever-glowing o'er man's hapless race,
Save the predestin'd, favourite, sons of grace,
There wakes a lyre, nor meanly skilled to move
The gladsome strain celestial, God is love.

Distinguish'd Bard! to whom so early giv'n
To vindicate the high behests of Heav'n,
See love o'er guilt and woe triumphant rise,
And judgment just, but mercy in disguise ;
Each path be thine to trace He whilum trod,
Prophet of Nazareth-approv'd of God;

His faith explore that he who ran might read,
Ere whelm'd in mystery's pedantic creed.
For lo! the night far spent, with influence bland,
Behold the promis'd latter-day at hand,
Again 10 illustrate Heav'n's eternal plan
To shew the Father, not the foe of man.

And, as thou rov'st by Cam's time-honour'd stream,
A Newton's haunt, a Milton's classic theme,
Of Learning, Science, the choice gifts be thine ;
Yet humble offerings at Religion's sbrine.
Clad in her panoply, nor fear to assail
The sceptic foe, or rend the mystic veil
By fraud and folly wrought, of various dies
That shrouds her form divine from vulgar eyes.
Thus shall thy manhood, grateful as thy youth,
Pay votive homage in the fane of truth,
Where erst they worshipp'd, Cam's enlighten'd sons
Nor envied mitred favourites of thrones ::
With Jebb, with Wakefield, thus to enrol thy name,
A meed beyond all Greek, all Roman fame.

J. T. R.

STANZAS ON WAR.

TROM LORD BYRON'S CHILDE HAROLD; A

ROMAUNT.

By Heaven! it is a pleasant sight to see
(For one who hath no friend, no brother there,)
Their rival scarfs of mix'd embroidery,
Their various arms that glitter in the air!
What gallant war-hounds rouse them from their lair,
And gnash their fangs, loud yelling for their prey !
All join the chase, but few the triumph share;

The grave shall bear the chiefest prize away,
And havoc scarce for joy can number their array.

Three hosts combine to offer sacrifice;
Three tongues prefer strange orisons on high;
Three gaudy standards flout the pale blue skies,
The shouts are France, Spain, Albion, Victory!
The foe, the victim, and the fond ally
That fights for all, but ever fights in vain,
Are met-as if at home they could not die,

To feed the crow on Talavera's plain,
And fertilize the field that each pretends to gain.

There shall they rot-Ambition's honour'd fools!
Yes, Honour decks the turf that wraps their clay!
Vain Sophistry! in these behold the tools,
The broken touls that tyrants cast away
By myriads, when they dare to pave their way
With human hearts—to what?-a dream alone.
Can despots compass aught that hails their sway?

Or call with truth one span of earth their own,
Save that wherein at last they crumble, bone by bone ?

Oh Albuera! glorious field of grief!
As o'er thy plain the pilgrim prick'd his steed,
Who could foresee thee, in a space so brief
A scene where mingling foes should toast and bleed!
Peace to the perish'd! may the warrior's meed
And tears of triumph their reward prolong!
Till others fall where other chieftains lead

Thy name shall circle round the gaping throng;
And shine in worthless lays, the theme of transient song!

Enough of Battle's minions ! let them play
Their game of lives, and barter breath for fame:
Fame that will scarce re-animate their clay,
Though thousands fall to deck some single name.
In sooth 'twere sad to thwart their noble aim
Who strike, blest birelings ! for their country's good,
And die, that living might have prov'd her shame;

Perish'd, perchance, in some domestic feud,
Or in a narrower sphere wild Rapine's path pursu'd.

ON SEEING A CHAPEL, FOR TRINITARIAN WORSHIP, ERECTLD ON

THE SITE OF A JEW'S MANSION.

Where Christians hymn, devout, the Sacred Three,
The Jew to One Jehovah bent the knee,
Yet stripp'd bis honours from Messiab's brow;
These Deify the man, and, erring, bow.
Blest age, predicted, come! when all shall own
That Christ is Lord, and God, our Father, One.

IGNOTUS.

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