Private Law Among the Romans, from the Pandects, Volum 2

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Macmillan and Company, 1815 - 423 pàgines
 

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Pàgina 138 - In the narrow plain of the rock they lie ; a dim ghost defends their tomb. There lovely Moina is often seen when the sunbeam darts on the rock, and all around is dark. There she is seen, Malvina ! but not like the daughters of the hill. Her robes are from the stranger's land, and she is still alone...
Pàgina 304 - I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews ; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law ; To...
Pàgina 294 - ... into ridicule; well, put beside one of his burlesque representations the chapter on the Missions, that where the order of the Hospitallers is depicted as succouring the travellers in the desert, or the monks relieving the sick in the hospitals, attending those dying of the plague in the lazarettos, or accompanying the criminal to the scaffold, what irony will not be disarmed — what malicious smile will not be converted into tears...
Pàgina 172 - In the days of Herod, king of Judea, there was a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia ; and his wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elisabeth.
Pàgina 17 - It is for this reason that you exercise all sorts of cruelties towards us. Ah if it were permitted to us to render evil for evil, a single night and a few torches would suffice for our vengeance. We are but of yesterday, and we are every where among you — your cities, your islands, your fortresses, your camps, your colonies, your tribes, your councils, the palace, the senate, the forum, in all these we abound, we leave you nothing free except your temples.
Pàgina 306 - There are two things in the truths of our religion — a divine beauty which renders them lovely, and a holy majesty which makes them venerable ; and there are two peculiarities in errors— an impiety which renders them horrible, and an impertinence which makes them ridiculous.
Pàgina 253 - Pompey's hapless sons renew the war, And Munda view the slaughtcr'd heaps from far; Though meagre famine in Perusia reign, Though Mutina with battles fill the plain; Though Leuca's isle, and wide Ambracia's bay, Record the rage of Actium's fatal day ; Though servile hands are arm'd to man the fleet.
Pàgina 77 - Hh. 2, The author is soon led to examine the problem of innate ideas- Without embracing the opinion that rejects them, or ranging himself with the party that adopts them, be believes that God has given to men in general, not to every man in particular, a certain portion of principles or innate sentiments, such as the idea of a Supreme Being, of the immortality of the soul, and of the first notions of our moral duties, absolutely necessary to the establishment of social order. Hence it happens, that,...
Pàgina 94 - Besides, I question whether he was well skilled in the Greek tongue, and in the study of the Belles Lettres, at least he seems not to set the value upon them they deserve. But both of them...
Pàgina 294 - Bossuet and Fenelon. Oppose to the caricatures of saints and of angels, the sublime effects of Christianity on the dramatic part of poetry, on eloquence, and the fine arts, and say whether the impression of ridicule will long maintain its ground...

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