Imatges de pÓgina
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bryo state, penetrated the exposed skin of the men, who usually went about without any other coverings than a hat, a shirt, and trowsers, while the officers, who were properly clad, and

generally wore boots or gaiters, were thus shielded against them.

The idea of contagion having been suggested, it may not be improper to add, that three drafts of recently impressed men, and a detachment of his Majesty's 56th regiment were received on board, while the worms were most prevalent, without any one of them receiving the disease; and I may add, that two of the Psyche's men were discharged in two other of his Majesty's ships, where they both had Guinea-worms, without communicating the disease to any other person.

47, Hoxton Town, April 25, 1815.

Case of very extensive and unexplained Fracture of the Ribs.

By Mr Lyon, Surgeon, Paisley. A. B. a lunatic, was a patient in an hospital, but his relations, wishing to take him under their own care, obtained his discharge. With assistance he walked about twenty yards from the hospital, entered a chaise, and was carried two miles into the country. On the 7th day after his departure, a phy~ sician was called to him, who informed me that he found the sternum and many of the ribs fractured, and the patient in a most distressing state, from difficulty of breathing, pain, cough, and other symptoms consequent to the injury. The physician under whose care Mr B. had been while in the hospital, having been informed of his melancholy situation, requested me to visit and examine him. Accordingly, on the 10th day after his departure from the hospital, I went to his relation's house, and, on inquiring for him, was told that he had died about two hours before my arrival. I was permitted to examine the body of the deceased, and found the thorax in a horrid condition, to use his relation's words, like a shattered basket.'

The body was examined the day after death (30th March 1809) in the presence of some friends.

The substance of the brain was uncommonly firm ; appearance of inflammation general over the cerebrum and cerebellum ; effusion under the membranes of the brain ; ventricles filled with water.

While the integuments of the thorax were removing, at various parts where the ribs were fractured or separated from their cartilages, a fuid, in some places iike pus, in others like bloody sanies, oozed out. The stergum was completely fractured transversely at its juncture with the third and fourth ribs. On the left side, the second and third ribs were fractured in two places, and the last was also separated from its cartilage ; the fourth and fifth ribs were fractured at one place near the sternal extremity; the seventh rib was fractured at its vertebral extremity, and the eighth was separated from its cartilage.

On the right side, the fourth, sixth, seventh, and eighth were fractured, and the fifth rib was separated from its cartilage.

Five English pints of a nearly transparent fluid were collected from the cavities of the thorax. The membranes on the convex surface of the right lung were destroyed for about the space of three or four inches; and the adhesion between the lung and the pleura costalis opposite the fifth rib was so strong, that a separation could not be effected without boring or cutting. The sharp end of the dorsal portion of the rib penetrated and adhered to the lung. On separating the adhesion, a small quantity of pus appeared. The left lung also adhered to the pleura, and the end of the fractured fifth rib likewise penetrated is substance. The pleura and mediastinum were highly in-flamed, and various other adhesions between them and the Jungs had formed. The heart and abdominal viscera were in good condition,

Diary of the Weather on the Northern Coast of the County of Antrim.

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365

Fair

15 10
13 12

25
17
4 23 10 7 9

156
Wet
2 4 4 1

7
9

10 54 Shovery

14 14 14 17 6 12 16 20 6 12 12 12 155
Fog
2 2 2 5

7
8 2

2

40 Snov, Sleet, &c. 29 10 10

6 11 13 84 Fres 21 8 6 0 0

0 2 10 47 Storny 6 6 3 3

3 2

4 6 12 11 65 Barometer 299 300 302 30 303 303 30 30 301 30 30 298 Morn. greatest height 30 1303 302 30 303 303 30 299 303 301 30 299 Even. Barameter

289

285 289 294 295 292 293 29 289 29 283 Morn. lowest

286 289 294 296 293 2931 292 289 289 289 Even. Thernometer 40 45 48

56 59 64 62 60 54 51 45 Morn. greatest height 43 45 49 55 57 60 66 65 61 57 50 46 Even. Thermometer 20 31

45 42 48 56 56

47 38 33 Morn. lowest 25 34 34

44 48 57 57 49 48 36 34 Even. Wind

SS. 15 S. 16 E.14 S. 17 E.15 E.13 S. 21 S. 18 S. 17 S, 16 N.10 S. 15 Morn.

Nuls. 138. 14S, 13E.14 E.11 S 17 S. 14S. 14 E, N. 9 E.12 Even.

286

283

1291

Thunder and Lightning.-One day in May, two in July, and one in August.Total, 4.

The observations are taken by Fahrenheit's Thermometer, and removed from the influence of either sun or fire.

The figures in the line Wind denote the number of days it blew in that direction.

N. B. Snow began to fall on the 3d of January, and was not completely thawed, until the 29th of March, continuing on the ground for 85 days.

1814.

THERMOMETER, N. exposure.

Months.

night.

4, 35

126, 67

Jan.

29, 44°N. W.21, 18° N. 31° 35° 29° 329 320 35° 33° 319 Feb. 8, 55 W. S 21, 23 N. E. 38 43 33 38 36 42 59 36 March 27, 54 S. W. 7, 27 N. E. 40 44 35 39 38 43 40 37 April 13, 63 N.

N. 49 56 43 50 50 54 52 45 May

S. 11, 38 E. 52 61 44 52 51 57 54 | 46 June 50, 75

S. 7, 43 S. E. 59 66 51 58 60 63 61 52 July 25, 76 S. E. 2,47 S. W. 61 71 55 63 66 69 67 56 August 4, 76 S. 128, 46 N. 61 70 54 62 63

65 55 Sept. 1,1 73 S. 10, 42 S. W. 57 66 50 58 60 63 62 52 October|14, 61 S. 9; 33 N.W. 46 55 44 50 49 5452 46 Nov.

14,57 N. 21, 25 N.W. 41 49 39 44 43 47 45 43 Dec.

11, 57 (s. W. 26, 28 N. E. 42 48 40 44 43 46 44 42

Mean te:

Thermometer
Highest by Six's Register
Lowest by ditto in the night
Mean of the extremes
Mean of the mean of the highest
Mean of the mean of the lowest
Mean of these two
Mean of observations at 9 morning
Mean of ditto, 2 afternoon
Mean of 9 morning and 2 afternoon
Mean of observations at 11 night
Mean of 9 A. M. 2 p. x. and 11 P. M.
Greatest variation in 24 hours

25th July 76°
21st Jan. 18°

480
55°
43°
49°
490
530
51°
45°

49° Dec. 19th, 20th, 17°

For Nov

Feb May Aug Six Six The

I SEND for insertion in your Journal the Annual Meteorol and admits of a much better comparison with accounts kept : pared with observations made at the Royal Society; but as tl any further, be defective. The rain is given only for eleven of January last has excited so much attention, I shall make se which commenced in London on the 27th of December did i all these days are marked fine. In the morning of the 2d which continued the whole of the next day, and was succeed night of the Ist, it had not before, since the morning of the this, the thermometer continued below the freezing point fro commenced, still freezing bard every night to the 27th. The gales from the S. E. which drifted the snow to the depth of sı ing of the 10th it stood at 20°, In the night of the 21st it re

Sidmouth, 5th February, 1814.

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Thermometer. Highest

July 28th Lowest

Jan. 13th Greatest variation, Dec. 9th & 10th Range in the year Mean for the day

5 Mean for the night

3 Anpual mean

On Sunday evening the 11th September, there appeared a splendid arch of Aurora Borealis, noticed in most of our newspapers ; but on the evening of the 4th November, a similar arch appeared in the north, which, though not quite so magnificent, seems not to have been remarked by any person except by those in this immediate neighbourhood. It first appeared between five and six in the evening, and was entirely gone before half after seven o'clock.

The months of November and December were very remarkable for great fluctuations in the barometer.-On the 16th December, the mercury rose one inch between nine o'clock in the morning and nine at night. During the night of the 15th, it fell 9-10ths of an inch.

A Report of the Sick and Hurt during one Year on board a Sloop

of War, Complement 125 Men.

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