Imatges de pÓgina
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An Abstract of the Registry kept at the Lying-in Hospital in Dublin, from the 8th of I

cember 1757, (the day it was first opened,) to the 31st December 1814.
From
Pa

Cami-
W-ni Deli

Total Women hav- Chil8th to tients out not vered Boys Girls of chil. ing twins and dren

dren 31st admit- deli in bos- Born. Born.

stiil dren.

dead.

dead Dec. ted. vered. pital.

born.

mes

more.

(1757

83

30

261

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136

13

122

5

145

7 7 10

549

Year ending 31st of December,

711

55
55 30 25 55

6 3
455
1758
454 255 207

8
462

54 21
413
1759
7 406 228 192 420

95
13 (1 had 3)

22
1760
571
15 556 300 260 560

116 35
537
1761

16 521

283
249 532 11

104 29
550
1762

17 533
279 966 545 12

106 33
31 488 274
1763 519

224
498 10

94 29
1764
610

588
287 308
595 7

28
1765 559 26 533 28 251

539
6

94 25
581
1766 611

324

585
4

111 18
31 664 373
1767 695

301 674
10

125 29
34
1768 689

653 362

302
664

154

47
33
1769 675
642 350
651

152 38
1770 705 35 670 372 S05 677 7

107 37
1771 724 29 695

370
341 711 16

102 44
21
1772 725
70+ 368 344 712 8

116

32
1773
727 S3 694 367
344 711 17

31
1774 709 28 681 357 334 691

10

134

29 1775 752 24 728 364 378 742 14

27
1776 833 31 802 418 407 825 22 (i liad 3) 132 39
1777 872 37 835 452 395 847 12

35
927
1778 961
476 460 956 9

127

39
1779 1064 53 1011 550 476 1026 15

146 59
48 919
1780 967

499 441 940

21

115 41
52 1027 598
1781 1079

447 1015 18

121 38 31 1782 1021

990

458
1007 17

127 57
63 1167
1783 1230
632 555 1185

91
17(1 had 3)

79
56 1271 643
1784 1317

641

23
1284

76 68
1785 1349
57 1292

610 1321 28 (1 had 3) 87 75
1786 1396 45 1351

716
656
1372 21

51 101
1347 705
1787 1418

670 1375 28

59 95 1788 1533 64 1469 725 771 1496

55
25(1 had 4)

73
62 1435 745
1789 1497

707

17
1452

38 84
64
1790 1610
1546 813 766 1579 32 (1 lad 3)

61 88
69 1602
1791) 1671

842
782
1624 22

75 87
70 | 1631
1792 1701

858 806 1664 31 (1 had 3) 65 83

64 1747
1793 1811
941 845 1786

68
38(1 had 3)

71 1794 1595 52 1543 835 744 1579 34 (3 had 3) 70 60 1795 1585 82 1503 827 719 15 16 42 (1 had 3) 72 57

63 17961 1684

1621 857 788 1645 23(1 had 3) 67 83

56
1797 1768

1712
908 840 1748

41

35 (1 had 3)
1798) 1674 70 1604 845 739 1634 29 (1 had 3) 47 103

83
1799 1620
1537 829 748 1577

53
38(1 had 3)

84
1800 1907
70 | 1837 965 899 1864 27

51
1801 1804 791 1725

864

894 1758 31 (1 had 3) 37 111 1802 2018 33 1985 1055 957 2012

25 (1 hads) 27 124
1803 2065 37 2028 1065 1000

2065 35 (2 had 3) 74 | 116
1804 1980
65 1915 1013 936 1949

54
57 | 22:20
1805 2277

1239
1031

50
2270

51 138
1806 2519
113 2406 1247 1204 2451

45

43 151 1807 2603 92 2511 1300 1249 2555 44

50 145 1808 2763 98 2665 1375 1334 2707

12

49 149
1809 2966 77 2889 1493 1442 2935 45(1 had 3) 45 165
1810 3016 162 2654 1546 1350 2896 42

54 179
18!1 2720 159 2561
1363 1250 2613 52

50

169 1812 2822 146 2676 1498 1316 2814 48

45

137
1813 2568 84 2481 1366
1178 2544 59 (1 had 3) 74

125
1814) 2611
93 2518 1323 1230 2553 35

86

139 Totals, 1811861 3175 1 780011 41523 ) 37982179503) 1372 | 4810 14329

6 15 11 8 8 10 23 25 12 95 10 19

97

7 10 13

8 101 18

116

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Proportion of Males and Females horií, about ten males to nine females.

Children dying in the hospital, about one to sixteen.
Children still-boin, about one to eighteen.
Women laving twins (and more), about one to fifty-sever.
Women dying in child bed, about one to ninety-three.
Women having three and four childres, about one to 3545.

Extract of a Letter from Professor Scarpa of Pavia, to John Wishart, Esq. Surgeon, Edinburgh. Favia, 13th January 1816.

I send in a box a copy of all my works, anatomical and surgical, except that on the diseases of the eyes, as the fifth Italian edition will soon be published, the only one which I have revised, since the first, after sixteen years' farther experience. With the books I send four of my cataract needles, and the gorget of Hawkins, as improved by me, in regard to which you will find a memoir of mine. I have seen some of my needles, said to have been made in England, but, from their enormous size, they seem to have been intended to operate on horses, and not on men. Experience has taught nie, that, in similar circumstances, the consecutive symptoms are directly as the size of the needle. With regard to the gorget, I beg that you will translate my memoir, that it may become known to the surgeons of your principal hospitals, on account of the rules to be observed in introducing the gorget, the inclination of the cutting edge of which is calculated to perform the lateral incision exactly, if the staff be held quite perpendicular, in the line of the raphe of the perinæum. I can assure you, that, with this instrument, I always make the incision of the prostate sufficiently large, and with certainty, to extract large stones, without fear of injuring the rectum, or arteria pudenda profunda. The cutler, in making this instrument, must attend particularly to the proper inclination between the cutting edge and the hollow of the gorget.

The death of Monteggia is unfortunately true. His sixth volume will be immediately published, but without notes. We have also lost Mascagni.

Among the books I send you, you will also find the Fisiologia of Jacopi, a favourite pupil of mine, whose death I deplore; also a memoir by him upon the inutility of the operation of paracentesis for the cure of tympanites, and another upon Darwin's doctrine of the retrograde motion of the lymphatics.

Extract of a Letter from Dr Kaufmann of Hannover, to John

Wishart, Esq. Surgeon, Edinburgh. I intended sending you the description of some singular cases which lately occurred to me One was a curious disease of the heart, wbich ended fatally ; another was the case of a new born infant, which lived twelve hours after birth, heard, took food, but did not breathe, or cry; it could not suck, but there was a regular motion of the thorax. On dissection, the lungs were found quite consistent, as in a foetus, with all the tests of having never inspired air; the heart was as usual, but the foramen ovale open.

Died, on Tuesday the 18th instant, (June) in the 82d year of his age, Mr Thomas Henry, President of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, Fellow of the Royal Society in London, and Member of several other learned Societies both in this country and abroad. As a practical and philoso phical chemist, he had obtained a high and merited reputation. His contributions to that science, desides a small volume of Essays and his Translations of the earlier writings of Lavoisier, which he first introduced to the notice of the English reader, consist chiefly of Memoirs, dispersed through the Transactions of the various Societies to which he belonged, and relating both to those parts of chemistry that are purely scientific, and to those which have a connection with the useful arts. On a subject intimately connected with the success of the cotton manufacture, (the employment of Mordaunts or Bases in dyeing.) 4. Mr Henry was the first,” to use the words applied to him by a subsequent author, “ who thought and wrote philosophically.” In the introduction, too, of the new mode of bleaching, which has worked an entire revolution in that art, and occasioned an incomparably quicker circulation of capital, he was one of the earliest and most successful agents. In addition to the acquirements connected with his profession, he had cultivated, to no inconsiderable degree, a taste for the productions of the Fine Arts : he had obtained a knowledge of historical events remarkable for its extent and accuracy; and he had derived, from reading and reflection, opinions to which he was steadily attached, on those topics of political, moral, and religious inquiry, which are most important to the welfare of mankind. For several years past, he had retired from the practice of medicine, in which he had been extensively engaged, with credit and success, for more than half a century; and, from delicate health, he had long ceased to iake an active share in the practical cultivation of science. But possessing, almost unimpaired, his facu'ties of memory and judgment, he continued to feel a lively interest in the advancement of literature and philosophy. Retaining, also, in their full vigour, those kind affections of the heart, that gave birth to the most estimable moral qualities, and secured the faithful atiachment of his friends, he passed through a long and serene old age, experiencing little but its comforts and its honours, and habitually thankful for the blessings with which Providence had indulged him.

Dr Clough, 68, Berner's Street, Physician-Accoucheur to the St Mary-la-bonne General Dispensary, and to the Endeavour, or Benevolent Society, &c. commences his Summer Course of Lectures on the science and practice of Midwifery, including -the diseases of women and children, on Monday morning, the 7th of July, at balf-past ten, and at seven in the evening.

Communications have been received from Mr MACKESY, &c. and publications for analytical criticism, hy Professors HUFELAND, AUTENRIETH, and FRORIEP, Drs ALBERS, PARKINSON, Mills, and CLANNY, Messrs DOUGHTY, WHATELÝ, and JARDINE,

Communications may be addressed to the Editors, to the care of Messrs CONSTABLE.& Co. Edinburgh ; Messrs LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, & BROWN, London ; and John CUMMING, Dablin.

No. XLVIII. will be published on the 1st of October 1816.

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Critical Review of the State of Medicine during the last Ten

Years. * W

HEN we review with impartiality the history of medicine

during its last period, its progressive advancement is undeniable, notwithstanding the despotic obstacles opposed to the

* For this valuable communication we are indebted to a Hannoverian friend, who had promised to send us an account of the latest German medical literature. When preparing to fulfil his promise, the article, of which this is the commencement, appeared in one of the most esteemed literary journals of Leipzig, and superseded the necessity of proceeding in his undertaking.

It is said to be written by the celebrated Kurt Sprengel, Professor at Halle, and author of the History of Medicine, and of the Critical Review of the State of Medicine during the last ten years of the 19th century, of which this is pro. perly a continuation. As Professor Sprengel does not confine himself to the progress of medicine in Germany, many additions and corrections might be made in regard to the medical literature of other countries, especially our own, with which there was almost no correspondence during the period of his history; but we have preferred leaving the article unaltered, for many reasons, and shall attempt, on a future occasion, to compose such a view of the recent literature of Great Britain, connected with our profession, as may more effectually correct the errors, and supply the defects unavoidably existing in the production of the learned German. In our translation we have only endea. voured to be faithful; and we fear that we have not always succeeded in rendering the meaning intelligible to those ynacquainted with the language of some of the philosophical sects prevalent in Germany, whose tenets are here alluded to.

VOL. XII. NO. 48.

Bb

free correspondence between civilized nations, and innumerable errors of the human understanding. The Germans, in particular, have reason to rejoice that the ignominious chains laid upon them by rapacious foreigners, could not hinder the unfettered mind from labouring incessantly to extend the empire of truth; nay, that the very circumstance of external oppression seems only to have had the effect of exciting greater efforts towards mental improvement.

The scientific part of medicine acquired in Germany and France great additions of new materials, which, though treated in very different ways, and even prematurely formed into systems, never lose their value, however preposterously applied in some instances. But we shall facilitate this review, by tracing the progress

of each branch of medicine separately.

I. History and Literature of Medicine. The frequently repeated complaint of the neglect of the study of the history of medicine seems to be unfounded during this period. For at least in Germany, Italy, and France, its history and literature were more generally studied than in earlier times. Sprengel's larger work was translated into French, indifferently by Griger, and better by Jourdan ; in å masterly manner into Italian by Arrigoni, and into English anonymously. J.C. Nicolai published an abridgment of Sprengel's work,* which the author himself had previously done in 1804. C. Windischmann's attempt to give the mystical views of medicine a historical dress, is truly ridiculous. + K. F. Lutheritz's view of the older systems, I as well as A. F. Hecker's similar work, y have no pretensions to originality.

In France the laudable desire of historical knowledge disa played itself in the most distinguished manner in Prunelle's excellent view of the influence of medicine on the restoration of the sciences in the middle ages, but in a less degree in P. J. G. Cabanis's sketch.

Das Merkwürdigste aus der Geschichte der Medicin. Th. 1. Rudolst. 1808. 8.

+ Versuch über den Gang der Bildung in der heilenden Kunst. Frkf. a. M 1809, 8.

I Die Systeme der Aerzte von Hippokrates bis auf Brown. Th. 1, 2. Dresden, 1810, 1811. 8.

s Die Heilkunde auf ihren Wegen zur Gewissheit. Dritte Auflage. Erf. 1808. 8.

|| De l'influence exercée par la médecine sur la renaissance des lettres, Montpellier, 1809. 4.

I Coup d'oeil sur les révolutions et la reforme de la médecine. Paris, 1804.8.

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