Imatges de pÓgina
PDF
EPUB

OF A

LARGE AND VALUABLE COLLECTION

OF

ANCIENT AND MODERN BOOKS,

NEW AND SECOND HAND,

IN EVERY DEPARTMENT OF

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART,

INCLUDING

MANY VALUABLE AND RARE WORKS

IN

Theology and Ecclesiastical History,

AND

METAPHYSICS, MORAL PHILOSOPHY, JURISPRUDENCE, POLITICAL ECONOMY, FINE
ARTS, MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES, GEOLOGY, NATURAL HISTORY, MEDICINE,

LANGUAGE, POETRY, FICTION, PHILOLOGY, VOYAGES
TRAVELS, HISTORY,.HERALDRY, BIOGRAPHY, ASTRONOMY,

ASTROLOGY, AND THE OCCULT SCIENCES;
Embracing Works which treat on everything which is
MIRACULOUS, QUEER, ODD, STRANGE, SUPERNATURAL, WHIMSICAL, ABSURD, OUT

OF THE WAY AND UNACCOUNTABLE!

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed]

FOR SALE, AT EXTREMELY LOW PRICES FOR CASH, BY
JOHN

DOYLE,
AT THE CHEAP ANCIENT AND MODERN BOOKSTORE,

THE MORAL CENTRE OF THE INTELLECTUAL WORLD,
146 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK.

MDCCCXLVIII.

OF READING.

“ One drachma for a good book, and a thousand talents for a true friend :

So standeih the market where scarce is ever costly :
Yea, were the diamonds of Golconda common as shingles on the shore,
A ripe apple would ransom kings before a shining stone:
And so, were a wholesome book, as rare as an honest friend,
To choose the book be mine: the friend let another take.
For altered looks and jealousies and fears have none entrance there :
The silent volume listeneth well, and speaketh when thou listest :
It praiseth thy good without envy, it chideth thine evil without malice,
It is to thee thy waiting slave, and thine unbending teacher.
Need to humor no caprice, need to bear with no infirmity,
Thy sin, thy slander, or neglect, chilleth not, quencheth not, its love ;
Unalterably speaketh it the truth, warped nor by error nor interest;
For a good book is the best of friends, the same to-day and forever.

“O books, ye monuments of mind, concrete wisdom of the wisest;

Sweet solaces of daily life; proofs and results of immortality;
Trees yielding all fruits, whose leaves are for the healing of the nations,
Groves of knowledge, where all may eat, nor fear a flaming sword;
Gentle comrades, kind advisers; friends, comforts, treasures :
Helps, governments, diversities of tongues ; who can weigh your worth ?—
To walk no longer with the just; to be driven from the porch of science;
To bid long adieu to those intimate ones, poets, philosophers and teachers;
To see no record of the sympathies which bind thee in communion with the good;
To be thrust from the feet of Him, who spake as never man spake;
To have no avenue to heaven but the dim aisle of superstition;
To live as an Esquimaux, in legarthy; to die as the Mohawk, in ignorance ;
O what were life, but a blank ? what were death, but a terror ?
What were man but a burden to himself? what were mind, but misery?.
Yea, let another Omar burn the full library of knowledge,
And the broad world may perish in the flames, offered on the ashes of its wisdom !"

S. W. BENEDICT,
Ster. & Print., 16 Spruce St., N. Y.

gift Tappan Preob, hasre 3-21-1933

ADVERTISEMENT.

In issuing this first part of the general Catalogue of his books, the subscriber thinks it may be necessary briefly to mention the purposes for which his establishment has been instituted, and the principles on which it is conducted. A house in which literary persons might find the best works in every language, particularly those which are difficult to be procured at a reasonable price, has long been a desideratum in our country, and one the want of which has been severely felt by those whose tastes led them to literary pursuits, but whose resources would not enable them to procure many works which were absolutely necessary to them. To obviate this difficulty, he has made it his particular study to collect such works as are scarce and valuable, and he flatters himself that he has succeeded in accumulating the largest collection of rare, curious, and valuable books that has ever been offered for sale on this continent. Many of the works indeed which will be found recorded in this and the succeeding numbers of his Catalogue, not only cannot be procured at any other store in this country, but are difficult to be met with even in the great book marts of Europe. Wherever it was possible to distinguish, he has paid the greatest attention to the choice of the best Editions.

His establishment presents another distinguishing feature in his stock of SECOND HAND BOOKS, which is larger and more complete than any other in America. But little attention has hitherto been bestowed by American booksellers on this branch ; they have looked more to the appearance of their stock than to its quality; content if they could realize large profits from gilded trash. It is certain, nevertheless, that nothing is better calculated to advance the cause of literature and science, than the sale of second hand works, by which the student is enabled to procure three or four books to the one he could before purchase.

The grand characteristic of his establishment, however, is its CHEAPNESS. It is in this particularly that he excels ; possessing extraordinary advantages in the purchase of his stock, he offers his books at extremely low prices, preferring small profits and ready sales, to large advances on cost, and a slow stock. A reference to the prices in this Catalogue will amply prove the truth of this assertion.

His stock of new books is very large, and is continually increasing. It embraces a valuable collection of French, Spanish, German and Italian works, as well as English and American. Any work on sale can be had from him

at a far lower price than the same can be procured in any other store. His prices are fixed, and no abatement will be made from them, except on account of quantity, or to the Trade. Ali orders will be executed with the utmost punctuality and despatch. Those ordering will please be particular to cite not only the Number, but also the First Word and Price of the article desired.

JOHN DOYLE. * Libraries, however extensive, or small collections of Books, purchased or exchanged.

BP. HALL'S MEDITATION ON A LIBRARY.

• What a world wit is bere packed up together! I know not whether this sight doth more dismay or comfort me: it dismays me to think that here is so much that I cannot know; it comforts me to think that this variety yields so good helps to know what I should. There is no truer word than that of Solomon: There is no end of making many books. This sight verifies it. There is no end ; indeed, it were pity there should. God hath given to man a busy soul; the agitation whereof cannot but, through time and experience, work out many hidden truths: to suppress these would be no other than injurious to mankind, whose minds, like unto so many candles, should be kindled by each other. The thoughts of our deliberation are most accurate; these we vent into our papers. What a happiness is it, that, without all offence of necromancy, may here call up any of the ancient Worthies of Learning, whether human or divine, and confer with them of all

my. doubts ! that I can, at pleasure, summon whole synods of reverend Fathers and acute Doctors from all the coasts of the earth, to give their well-studied judgments in all points of question which I propose ! Neither can I cast my eye casually upon any of these silent masters but I must learn somewhat. It is wantonness to complain of choice. No law binds us to read all; but the more we can take in and digest, the better-liking must the mind needs be. Blessed be God, that hath set up so many clear lamps in His Church. Now, none but the wilfully blind can plead darkness. And blessed be the memory of those his faithful servants that have left their blood, their spirits, their lives, in these precious books; and have wasted themselves into these during monuments, to give light unto others.”

BP. HALL ON THE PLEASURE OF STUDY.

“ What a heaven lives the scholar in, that at once, in one close room, can daily converse with all the glorious Martyrs and Fathers !—that can single out, at pleasure, either sententious Tertullian, or grave Cyprian, or resolute Jerome, or flowing Chrysostom, or divine Ambrose, or devout Bernard, or, who.alone is all these, heavenly Augustine ; and talk with them, and hear their wise and holy counsels, verdicts, and resolutions. Let the world contemn us; while we have these delights, we cannot envy them; we cannot wish ourselves other than we are.

Study itself is our life ; from which we would not be barred for a world : how much sweeter, then, is the fruit of study, the conscience of knowlege! in comparison whereof, the soul that hath once tasted it easily contemns all human comfort.

“Go now, ye worldlings, and insult over our paleness, our neediness, our neglect. Ye could not be so jocund, if you were not so ignorant: if you did not want knowledge, you would not overlook him that hath it. For me, I am so far from emulating you, that I profess I would as lief be a brute beast, as an ignorant rich man.”

JOHN DOYLE'S
CATALOGUE OF BOOKS.

very neat

Theology.
"Come and take choice of all my Library,

And so beguile thy sorrow." 1 ABAUZIT (M.) Miscellanies on Historical, Theological and Critical Sub

jects. Translated from the French by E. Harwood, London, 1774.
8vo. calf, very
neat

$0 75 2 ABEEL (Rev. David) The Missionary Convention at Jerusalem ; or, an

exhibition of the claims of the World to the Gospel. New York, 1838, 12mo. cloth, very neat, incut

31 3 ABBOTT (Jacob) The Way to do Good; or, the Christian Character mature. Boston, 1836, 12mo. cloth, front.

38 4 ABBOTT (Jacob) The Young Christian; or, a familiar illustration of the

Principles of Christian Duty. Boston, 1833, 12mo. cloth, neat 38 5 Account (A plain) of the Nature and End of the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper. To which are added forms of prayer. London, 1735, 8vo. calf,

50 6 ADAMS (Hannah) The Truth and Excellence of the Christian Religion exhibited. Boston, 1804, 12mo. sheep, scarce, neat

38 7 AIRESEŌN ANASTASIS ; or, a new way of deciding old controversies. By Basanistes. London, 1815, 8vo. boards, neat

50 8 Alciati (D. Andreæe) omnia quæ in hunc usq ; diem sparsim prodierunt usquam opera.

Basil, 1548, folio, vellum, very neat, scarce 2 00 9 ALEXANDER (Archibald) A Brief Outline of the Evidences of the Christian Religion. Princeton, 1825, 8vo. boards, neat

38 10 ALEXANDER (Joseph Addison) The earlier and later Prophecies of Isaiah. New York, 1847, 2 vols. 8vo. cloth.

4 00 11 ALLEN (Rev. Thomas G.) Memoir of, by his brother; to which is

added the funeral sermon. Philadelphia, 1832, 12mo. col. calf, very neat, portrait.

63 12 ALLEINE (Rev. Joseph). Life and Death of: to which are added his Christian letters. New York, 1840, 12mo. cloth

38 13 ALLEN (Rev. Benj.) The History of the Church of Christ. Philadelphia, 1823, 2 vols. 8vo. sheep, very neat

1 50 14 Allwood (Rev. Philip). A Key to the Revelation of St. John, the di

vine, being an Analysis of those parts of that wonderful book which relate to the general state of the Christian Church. London, 1829, 2 vols. 8vo. cloth (published at £1 4s. sterling)

3 00 15 ANDERSON (G.) A Remonstrance against Bolingbroke's Philosophical Religion. Edinburgh, 1756, 8vo. calf, neat

63 16 ANDERSON (Rev. Robert). The Lord's Prayer, a Manual of Religious Knowledge. London, 1841, 12mo. cloth front.

38 17 ANDREWS William Eusebius). A Critical and Historical Review of

Fox's Book of Martyrs, showing the inaccuracies, falsehoods, and misrepresentations of that work of deception. London, 1824, 2 vols. 8vo. sheep, plates, neat

2 00 Better is the wrong with sincerity, than the right with falsehood.

« AnteriorContinua »