The Pillars of Priestcraft and Orthodoxy Shaken, Volum 2

Portada
Mr. Cadell, 1768
 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Pàgines seleccionades

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 313 - For a nation thus abused to arise unanimously and to resist their prince, even to the dethroning him, is not criminal but a reasonable way of vindicating their liberties and just rights. It is making use of the means, and the only means, which God has put into their power for mutual and self-defense, and it would be highly criminal in them not to make use of this means.
Pàgina 74 - Stand and hold fast, from henceforth, the place to which you have been heir by the succession of your forefathers, being now delivered to you by the authority of Almighty God, and by the hands of us and all the bishops and servants of God. And, as you see the clergy to come nearer the altar than others, so remember that, in all places convenient, you give them greater honour...
Pàgina 325 - ... which they professed. And, amongst other strange things which his first Parliament did, they ordered the thirtieth of January — the day on which his father was beheaded — to be kept as a day of solemn humiliation, to deprecate the judgments of Heaven for the rebellion which the nation had been guilty of, in that which was no national thing, and which was not rebellion in them that did it. Thus they soothed and flattered their new king at the...
Pàgina 315 - ... the solemn oath which he had taken at his coronation. It would be endless, as well as needless, to give a particular account of all the illegal and despotic measures which he took in his administration...
Pàgina 309 - ... principle that parents and masters may in some cases be lawfully resisted, to resist when resistance is unnecessary^ and therefore criminal ? Is the principle, in either case, false in itself merely because it may be abused, and applied to legitimate disobedience and resistance in those instances 'to which it ought not to be applied? According to this way of arguing, there will be no true principles in the world ; for there are none but what may be wrested and perverted to serve bad purposes,...
Pàgina 324 - ... much less are the whole body of the nation at that time to be charged with rebellion on that account : for it was no national act ; it was not done by a free Parliament. And much less still is the nation at present to be charged with the great sin of rebellion for what their ancestors did, or, rather, did not, a century ago. But how came the anniversary of King Charles's death...
Pàgina 312 - While those who govern, do it with any tolerable degree of moderation and justice, and in any good measure act up to their office and character, by being public benefactors, the people will generally be easy and peaceable and be rather inclined to flatter and adore than to insult and resist them.
Pàgina 301 - ... distracted, and attempts, in his mad fit, to cut all his children's throats: Now, in this case, is not the reason before assigned, why these children should obey their parent while he continued of a sound mind, namely, their common good, a reason equally conclusive for disobeying and resisting him, since he is become delirious, and attempts their ruin? It makes no...
Pàgina 302 - ... and rebellion. If any other powers oppress the people, it is generally allowed that the people may get redress by resistance, if other methods prove ineffectual. And if any officers in a kingly government go beyond the limits of that power which they have derived from the crown (the supposed original source of all power and authority in the state), and attempt illegally to take away the properties and lives of their fellow-subjects, they may be forcibly resisted, at least till application can...
Pàgina 305 - ... men to determine. Thus it appears, that the common argument, grounded upon this passage, in favor of universal, and passive obedience, really overthrows itself, by proving too much, if it proves any thing at all; namely, that no civil officer is, in any case whatever, to be resisted, though acting in express contradiction to the design of his office; which no man, in his senses, ever did, or can assert. If we calmly consider the nature of the thing itself, nothing can well be imagined more directly...

Informació bibliogràfica