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To his Friend, a Reviver of Old Literature,

ALEXANDER

BALLOCH

GROSART, LL.D.,

EDITOR OF MANY FAMOUS AUTHORS, INCLUDING A LONG LINE OF

Cavalier Poets and Puritan Divines;

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WHOSE WRITINGS HE HAS GIVEN BACK TO THE WORLD WITH
UNTIRED ZEAL, INDUSTRY, AND INTELLIGENCE ; NOT
ALONE THE ACKNOWLEDGED WORTHIES,' OF
FULLER AND OF CHERTSEY, BUT ALSO, TO
SECURE TARDY JUSTICE AND FAME

FOR THEIR NEGLECTED GENIUS,

' The Inheritors of Unfulfilled Renown : '

This Fifth Volume of The Boxburghe Ballads,

(issued on the Bicentenary of Monmouth's Insurrection)

Illustrating the last years of the Stuarts in

Political and Social History,

IS HERE

DEDICATED,

With affectionate esteem by his Friend and Fellow-Student,

JOSEPH WOODFALL EBSWORTH.

MIDSUMMER, 1884.

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Jntroduction to the Second Volume

of the Second Series of Rorburghe Ballads.
" Ancient libels and contraband books, I assure ye,

We'll print as secure from Exchequer or Jury;
One tome Miscellaneous we'll add 10 your store,
Resolving next year to print one volume more.

One volume more, my friends, one volume more;
Pay down your subscriptions for one volume more !"

-Sir Walter Scott's Bannatyne-Club Song, 1823.
HE ENTIRE CAREER OF MONMOUTH

is displayed in the series of Ballads, Songs, and Political Poems, given in the present volume, and in the concluding portion of the one

immediately preceding. Here, for the first time reprinted, are many of the choice broadsides gathered by SAMUEL Pepys, and bequeathed by him to Magdalen College, Cambridge: treasures of the Bibliotheca Pepysiana ; for the use of which we duly record our thanks to the learned and reverend the Master, the Fellows, and the Librarian of that venerable foundation. Here are, also for the first time gathered, and re-arranged, all reprinted in extenso, a much larger number of similar ballads from the original Harleian, Pearson, or Roxburghe Collection, and from the Benjamin Heywood Bright Supplementary-volume; from the purchases made by Narcissus Luttrell (marked occasionally by himself with the date when he obtained them); and from others,

Bicentenary of Monmouth's Insurrection.

including Ant. á Wood's at Oxford, and in the Editor's private store of rarities, Trowbesh Manuscripts and printed broadsides. From State Papers at the Record Office, and in the rich garner of the British Museum, we have called many things that help to make the past intrigues more clear. The character of the actors in the tragi-comedy of two hundred years ago can now be studied accurately by those who are unprejudiced, and not too soon disgusted at human weakness or vice. Ours is a BICENTENARY VOLUME OF MONMOUTH'S INSURRECTION, issued in 1885, but finished beforehand.

Surely not without interest or historical value are our copies of all the original woodcuts, such as the Trial and the Execution of Algernon Sydney (on pp. 426, 429); and of Lord W. Russell : even the inappropriate hap-hazard introduction of long-earlier civil-war engravings; such as that of John Wentworth, the Earl of Strafford, being ferried across the Styx, to meet his predecessor, William Noy, on the farther shore (see p. 463); or the mediæval battle-piece which was brought into service to represent Sobieski's victory over the Turks at the Siege of Vienna in 1683 (see p. 372). These woodcuts include several that were by no means due to subscribers, because not belonging to the Roxburghe Collection, e.g. the contemporary pourtrayal of “ Frost-Fair on the Thames,” in the winter of 1683-1684; which forms the frontispiece to Part XIV., being the Third Group of Monmouth Ballads; also the Beheading of Monmouth and the Hanging of his Followers in the West (on pp. 699, 701); or the picture of the moated Rye-House, where King Charles II. was to have been assailed by the conspirators (Frontispiece to the present Vol. V.). They have, one and all, been given single-handedly by the Editor, at his own cost of ungrudged toil, without repayment of a penny from the funds of the Society, which are left wholly devoted to the payment of printing and paper. This task, voluntarily accepted, necessarily long protracted, and in his present failing health by no means light, is being wrought out in the hope of securing a speedy completion of the entire work, a full reproduction of The Börburghe Ballads. It seems to be an insult and a degradation that subscribers omit to do their duty by affording the required assistance to this desired work, while the Editor conquers a three-fold amount of labour freely in their behalf. Were the printing

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