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Lord Hood showed at once his judgment and his sense of the value of Sir Sidney's services, by appointing him to be the bearer of the despatches to England, containing an account of these stir

SHIPS OF THE LINE.

List of ships of the line, frigates, and sloops, of the department of Toulon. In the road where the English fleet entered Toulon :

Burnt at Leghorn.

Guns. Now with the English fleet.

Le Scipion

74 Guns. Le Commerce de Marseilles Remaining at Toulon. 120 | Le Genereux

74 Le Pompée

74

FRIGATES.

Now with the English fleet.
Burnt at Toulon.
Le Perle

40 Le Tonnant

80 L'Heureux

40 74

L'Aréthuse Le Centaur

74 Fitted out by the English. Le Commerce de Bor

L'Aurora

32 deaux

- 74 Put into commission by order Le Destin

74

of Lord Hood.
74
La Topaze

32 Le Héros

74

Remaining in the power of Le Thémistocle

74

the Sardinians. Le Dugay Trouin 74

L'Alceste

32 Sent into the French ports

SLOOPS. on the Atlantic, with French Now with the English fleet. seamen, &c.

La Poulette

26 Le Patriote 74 Le Tarleston

14 L'Apollon

74

Burnt at Toulon. L'Orion 74 La Caroline

20 L'Entreprenant 74 L'Auguste

20

Le Lys

ring events. He was favourably-indeed, without incurring the blame of exaggeration, we may

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Guns.

Guns. Fitted out by the English. In the harbour, in want of La Belette

26

repair : La Prosélyte

24

SHIPS. La Şincère

20 Burnt at Toulon. Le Mulet

20
Le Mercure

74 La Moselle

20
La Couronne

80 Fitted out by the Neapolitans. Le Conquerant

74 Le Dictateur

74 L'Employe

20

Remaining at Toulon. Fitted out by the Spaniards.

Le Languedoc

80 La Petite Aurore

18
Le Censeur

74
Sent to Bordeaux.
Le Guerrier

74 Le Pluvier

20
Le Souverain

74 Fitting out when the English

Unfit for Service. fleet entered Toulon : L’Alcide

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74

SHIPS OF THE LINE.

FRIGATES.

Burnt at Toulon.

Burnt at Toulon.
Le Triomphant

80
Le Courageux

32 Le Suffisant 74 L'Iphigenie

32 L’Alerte

16 Now with the English fleet. Le Puissant

74 Having on board the powder

magazines, burnt at Toulon. Remaining at Toulon.

L'Iris

32 Le Dauphin Royal 120

Le Montreal

32

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FRIGATE.

Burnt at Toulon. Le Serieuse

Fitted out by the English as a

bomb-ketch. La Lutine

32

32

say, was enthusiastically received in London. He was caressed at the Admiralty, and distinguished at the court of his sovereign.

As it is our office to record the events of Sir Sidney's life more as a public than as a private character, we shall not inflate these volumes with anecdotes, which, however pleasing in themselves, have nothing to do with the official career of his usefulness and of his glory. It will be sufficient to say, that, during his short cessation from actual service, he was sought for and cherished in the best and most distinguished circles.

:

Guns.

Guns. Remaining at Toulon.

Taken by the English. La Bretonne 18 L'Imperieuse

40 La Modeste

32 In commission before the Eng

L'Eclair

20 lish fleet entered Toulon:

At Ville Frunche.
SHIP
La Vestale

36
In the Levant.
La Badine

24 La Duquesne 74 | Le Hazard

30 FRIGATES AND SLOOPS

At Corsica.
In the Levant.
La Mignon

32

At Cette.
La Sibylle

40
La Brune

24 La Sensible

32 La Melpomène

. La Minerve

40

La Junon La Fortunée

32

Building. La Flèche 24 One ship of

74 La Fauvette 24 Two frigates

40 VOL. I.

G

10 In ordinary at Toulon

40

CHAPTER VII.

Appointed to the Diamond His services on the Channel

station-Attacks two French ships under La Hogue-Destroys a French corvette-Attacks a French squadron which had taken shelter in the Port of Herqui.

Having, by the late splendid though incomplete operations, given earnest to his superior officers, and to the country at large, that he was possessed of abilities of the highest order, Sir Wm. Sidney Smith was appointed by the Lords of the Admiralty, in the commencement of the year 1794, to the command of the Diamond frigate, on the station of the British Channel.

The officers and the crew of the Diamond soon experienced the beneficial effects of his enlightened and energetic command. At this period very many and very hurtful prejudices existed in the service. A mixture of firmness and conciliation in the carrying out of improve

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ments soon removed most of the anomalies that interfered with the due efficiency of the force under Captain Sir Sidney Smith's command. The Diamond became one of the most perfect specimens of a vessel of war in the British navy. Next to the conquest or destruction of the enemy, the greatest glory that can be achieved by the commander is the ennobling of the force under his

government by judicious expedients, and the employing an enlightened discipline to enable him to do so.

It would be tedious to enumerate all the minutiæ of a blockading cruise in the Channel—the chase by day, and the dangerous approximation to the enemy's harbour by night—the interchange of shot with the batteries, and the verifying of the charts, under the very guns of the enemy, by soundings in the boats. Though each of these operations may seem to be but a little matter of itself, the whole makes a service no less arduous than it is necessary. Insignificant as this may appear to be, it affords an ample field in which the abilities of the officer in command can be fairly and almost fully tested.

No sooner had the year 1795 been ushered in by the din of a war soon to become almost universal, than the government at home received what was considered to be authentic information that the French feet, under Admiral Villare de Joyeuse,

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