The Theory and Practice of Banking, Volum 1

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Longmans, Green, 1892 - 1152 pàgines
 

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Continguts

On Barter Sale or Circulation and Exchange
46
On the Channel of Circulation
52
On Production
59
On Supply and Demand
65
Great contest between the Bank and the South Sea Company
66
Personal Qualities as Capital
72
On the Conversion of Floating into Fixed Capital
80
Third AmbiguityOn the double meaning of the words
88
Summary of Definitions
98
Reciprocal Demand is the Origin of Value
104
SECTION II
118
Even where Labour has been bestowed on anything which
128
SECTION III
135
Opinion of Mr George Ellison
137
CHAPTER III
142
Meaning of the Market Price of Gold and Silver
148
Introduction of a Gold Coinage in England
155
The System of Credit Banking and Bills of Exchange
159
SECTION II
173
Advantage of adopting the Conception of Economics as
179
Error of Peacock 19 On the Application of the Theory of Algebraical signs
185
19
186
Examples of the Algebraical Signs applied to Operations
192
26 A Person exercising any Profitable Business is an Economic Quantity analagous to Land
196
If Money is termed Positive Capital Credit may be termed Negative Capital
197
On Debts as Negative Quantities
198
SECTION III
200
On Property held in Contract or on Jura in Personam
201
Unilateral and Bilateral Coutracts
202
On the Sale or Transfer of Debts in Roman Law
204
The Pretorian Jurisdiction
205
The Sale of Debts made free
209
On the Principles of English Law and Equity relating to the Sale or Transfer of Debts
211
Lord Cokes reason erroneous
212
Nature of Feudal Society
213
Appointment of a Royal Commission to prepare a Digest of the Law
214
Contract between Lord and Vassal
216
On the Rules of the Common Law of England relating to the Transfer of Chosesinaction
218
Feuds and Charters made Assignable
219
Case in which the Debtor had not assented to the Transfer of the Debt
221
General Results of the prece ling Case 3
222
Promissory Notes could not be sued upon at Common Law
223
Similar Decisions of the Court of Session
225
In Grant v Vaughan the Kings Bench holds these Cases erroneous
226
Lord Holts Cases in modern times supposed to be correct
227
Respondentia Bonds held assignable
228
On the Property of the Transferee in Instruments Lost or Stolen
231
On the Origin of the Dogma that Chosesinaction are not Assignable at Common Law 281
234
For 550 years the Courts of Common Law held Chosesin action Assignable
235
Bills and Notes were Deeds or Specialties in English Law
236
Signature substituted for Seals
237
Modern doctrine due to Lord Kenyon
238
Case of Johnson v Collings in 1800
239
Lord Mansfield founder of Mercantile Jurisprudence
240
The Case of Bovill v Dixon
244
The Author selected by the Law Digest Commissioners to prepare the Digest of the Law of Bills of Exchange
248
The Case of Crouch y The Credit Foncier of England
252
Points of Conflict between the principles held in this case and those in the Authors Digest
256
The Case of Goodwin v Robarts
259
Chosesinaction made Transferable by Statute
263
SECTION IV
265
Origin of Bills of Exchange
266
Revival of Banking in Europe
267
The Statute of Merchants
269
Promissory Notes payable to bearer in common use in the time of Edward IV
271
The word Bill included Deeds
272
Bank Post Bills
274
On Bills of Exchange Drafts and Promissory Notes
275
Definition of a Draft
277
Definition of a Promissory Note
278
Upon Indorsement
279
On Banking Instruments of Credit
281
Bankers Notes and Cheques
283
Section V
285
On the Extinction of Obligations
287
On Release or Acceptilatio
288
The Release of a Debt in all cases Equivalent to a Donation or Payment in Money
289
CHAPTER V
302
Distinction between Bills of Exchange and Bills of Lading
311
same
330
On the Legal Relation between Banker and Customer
333
34
334
Error of the Common Description of Banking
336
14 On the Clearing House
337
Contrast between the Common Notions about Banking and the Reality
357
How Credit is Capital to a Banker
358
On Accommodation Bills 3
359
Explanation of the Real Danger of Accommodation Bills
361
On the Danger of Accommodation Paper to a Bank
363
The Case of Laurence Mortimer Co 30+ 31 On the Transformation of Temporary Credit into Permanent Capital
369
CHAPTER VII
372
On Banking Discount
373
Table of Profits
374
To find in what Time a Sum of Money will double itself at Simple Banking Discount
375
To find the Amount of a given Sum in any Time at Com pound Banking Discount
377
To find in what Time a Sum of Money will double itself at Compound Banking Discount
378
Formulæ for the Amount of a Sum at Interest and Discount Simple and Compound
379
To find the Profit on Discounting at more frequent intervals than a year
380
CHAPTER VIII
381
On the Nominal Exchange
382
If the Coinage is in a Depreciated State to determine whether the Exchange is Favourable at Par or Adve se
384
On Inconrertible Paper Money
386
Lord Kings Law of Paper Money
387
On the Real or Commercial Exchange
389
On Exchange with Four Parties 350
390
The Time Par of Exchange
391
On Foreign Exchange
392
Effects of the Exchanges being Favourable or Adverse to London
393
Exchange between London and Places to which it Gives the Variable Price
394
On the Limits of the Variations of the Exchanges
395
Effects of the Restoration of the Coinage on the Exchanges
396
On Exchange Operations
397
On the Real or Commercial Exchange
401
The Mercantile System
404
Examples of Foreign Trade
405
Further Example
408
Foreign Market
409
Example from New York
410
Cause of Export of Bullion
411
Causes of drain of Bullion
412
Russian and Irish Exchanges
413
Foreign Trade may not require Export of Bullion
414
Error of Balance of Trade
415
On the Rate of Discount as influencing the Exchanges
417
On Foreign Loans Securities and Remittances as affecting the Exchanges
418
Payment of the French Indemnity
421
The India Council Bills
427
On Monetary and Political Convulsions as affecting the Exchanges
430
Great scarcity in 1800
433
Afterwards they entrust it to the Goldsmiths
436
The third attempt succeeds and an Act passed for the estab
448
PAGE
457
in 1720
496
Proposals of the Bank and amended proposals of both
497
Bursting of the bubble mania
498
Formation of the Reserve Fund or Rest
499
Renewal of the Charter in 1742 and extension of the Monopoly
500
Rebellion in Scotland in 1745 and run upon the Bank
501
Rise in the market price of Gold from the deterioration of the Coinage
504
Renewal of the Charter in 1781
505
Which gives rise to a great multiplication of country Bank Notes
506
Derangement of the Foreign Exchanges
507
Doctrine of Mr Bosanquet
508
Declaration of War in 1793 and commercial panic
509
Pressure on the London Bankers
510
Three different causes for a demand for guineas
511
Appointment and Report of the Committee of the House of Commons
512
Sums sent down to Manchester and Glasgow allay the panic
513
Approved by the Bullion Report
514
London Bankers discontinue the issue of Notes
515
Advances by the Bank to Government contrary to its Charter
516
Act obtained by Mr Pitt and pressure exerted by him on the Bank
518
Mr Pitt pays no attention to the remonstrances of the Di
519
Meeting of Parliamentgreat failure of the harvest
520
Proposal of further loans remonstrance of the Bank
521
Unscrupulous conduct of Mr Pitt
522
Mr Pitt solicits further loans from the Bank
523
Mr Pitt again demands further loans from the Bank
524
in 1796
525
Demand of guineas for Ireland in January 1797
526
Great drain of Bullion from the Bank of England proposal of a suspension of cash payments
527
Great contraction of the Banks issues in February 1797
528
State of the cash in the Bank when it stopped payment
529
131
530
Commencement of embarrassments in 1795 which led to the suspension of cash payments in 1797 516
531
Opinion of Mr Walter Boyd
532
Cause of part of the embarrassment according to Sir Francis Baring 510
539

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