Imatges de pÓgina
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Years from 1 to 30.

One gill of liquor per|| day, is

One pint per day, is

Five gills per day, is

One quart per day, is

Andover
I 23.2
Eduards

TABLE.

1

2

for liquor, is

Sa Six cents per day for liquor, is

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D. C.

43 80

87 60 131 40 175 20 219 00 262 80 306 60 350 40

Eighteen cents per day for liquor, is

D. C.

D. C.

11 46 57

Gal. Gal. Gal. Gal. D. C. D. C. D. C. 911 10 95 21 90 32 85 43 80 65 70. 65 70 98 55

22 92 114 182 21 90

54 75 109 50 164 25

91 25 182 50 273 75

3

32 85

219 00

365 00

273 75

33 138 171 273 4 44 184 223 364 43 80 87 60131 40 51 55 230 285 455 54 75 109 50 164 25| 6 66 276 342 546 65 70 131 40 197 10 7 77 322 399 637, 76 65 153 30 229 95 8

456 25

547 50

638 75

262 80
328 50
394 20
459 90
525 60
591 30
657 09
722 70

730 00 821 25 766 50 912 50 843 15 1.003 75 919 80 1.095 00 996 45 1.185 25 920 80 1.073 10 1.277 50

394 20 438 00 481 80 525 60 569 40 613 20 657 00

328 51 383 25 88 368 456 728 87 60 175 20 282 80 438 00 9 99 414 513 819 98 55 197 10 295 65 492 75 10 110 460 570 910 109 50 219 00 328 50 547 50 11 121 506 627 1001 120 45 240 90 361 35 602 25 12 132 552 684 1092 131 40 262 80 394 20 657 00 13 143 598 741 1183 142 35 284 70 427 05 711 75 14 154 644 798 1274 153 30 206 60459 90 766 50 15 165 690 855 1365 164 25 228 50 492 75 821 25 985 59 1.149 75 1.368 75 16 176 736 912 1450 175 20 250 40 525 60 700 80 876 091.051 201.226 40 1.460 09 17 187 782 969 1547 186 15 272 30 558 45 744 60 930 75 1.116 90 1.303 05 1.551 25 18 198 828 1026 1638 197 10 294 20 591 30 788 40 985 50 1.182 60 1.379 70 1.642 50 19 209 874 1083 1729 208 05/316 10 624 15 832 20 1.040 251.248 30 1. 456 35 1.733 75 20 220 920 1140 1820 219 00 338 0C 657 00 876 00 1.095 00 1.314 00 1.533 00 1.825 00 21 231 966 1197 1911 229 95 359 90 689 85 919 80 1.149 751.379 70 1.609 651.916 25 22 242 1012 1257 2002 240 80 381 80 722 70 963 60 1.204 50 1.445 40 1.686-30 2,007 5 23 253 1058 1311 2093 251 75 403 70 755 55 1.007 40 1.259 25|1.511 101.762-95/2.098 75 24 264 1104 1368 2184 262 70 425 70 788 40 1.051 20 1.314 00 1.576 80 1.839 60 2.190 00

788 40
854 10

275 1150 1425 2275 273 65 447 50 821 25 1.095 00 1.368 75 1.642 50 1.916 25 2.281 25 286 1196 1482 2366 284 60 469 40 854 101.138 80 1.423 50 1.708 20 1.992 90 2.372 50 27 29 1242 1539 2457 295 55 491 30 886 95 1.182 60 1.478 25 1.773 90 2.069 55 2.463 75 28 308 1288 1596 2548 306 40 513 20 919 80 1.226 40 1.533 00 1.839 60 2.146 20 2.555 00 29 319 1334 1653 2639 317 45 535 10 952 65 1.270 2011.587 751.905 30 2.222 85 2.646 25 130 330 1380 1710 2730 338 40 557 00 985 50 1.314 00 1.642 501.971 00 2.299 50/2.737 50

Twenty-one cents per day for liquor, is

D. C.

65 70 131 40

197 10

Twenty-five cents per day for liquor, is

D. C.

76 65 153 30

229 95

306 60

383 25

459 90

536 55

613 20
689 85

This table is designed as a help to all classes of spirit drinkers, from the man who uses his gill per day, to the man who uses his pint, and the one who uses his quart, and closes the day in a state of intoxication. Each of these classes may, by inspection of this table, see the quantity they will drink in one, two, or five years, and so on to thirty.

We have also calculated the expense of drinking, from one to thirty years at different sums per day, from three to twenty-five cents. Few persons who spend three, six, or twelve cents per day, are aware how fast the amount increases, or of how many comforts they deprive themselves, by their habit of small expenditures. One thing, however, must be noticed in the expense part of this table; no interest is added to the principal, and no calculation is made for loss of time, &c. These would greatly increase the respective sum total. —

Temp. Rec.

All communications, relative to the general concerns of the Amer. ican Temperance Society, may be addressed to the Rev. Justin Edwards, Corresponding Secretary, ANDOVER, MASS.

Donations and the payment of subscriptions, and all communications with regard to money, may be sent to Hon. GEORGE Odiorne, Treasurer of the Society, 97 Milk Street, Boston.

CONTENTS.

PART I.

Connection between Error in Principle and Immorality in Practice, 1; Consequences fatal, ];

Testimony of Physicians, Jurists and Divines, 3; State previous to the Temperance Reform,

4; Great Change, 5; Origin of the American Temperance Society, 6; Testimony to the Ben-

efits of Abstinence, 7; "The Well-conducted Farm," 8; Formation of the American Temper-

ance Society, 11; Address of the Executive Committee, 12; The Infallible Antidote, 14; Na-

tional Philanthropist, 15; Temperance Association in Andover, 15; Agents, 15; Temperance

Publications, 16; Resolutions of the Massachusetts Society for Suppression of Intemperance,

17; Testimony of Kittredge and Beecher, 18; Testimony of Medical Societies, 21; State of

Things at the close of 1827, 22; Operations and Success in 1828, 23; Kittredge's Address at

the Annual Meeting, 24; State of Things at the close of 1829, 27; Decrease of Mortality, 28;

Increased Success of the Gospel, 28; Commencement of the Temperance Reformation in

Europe, 29; Operations and Success in 1830, 30; Testimony of Members of Congress, 32;

Testimony of the President of the United States, 32; Testimony of the Secretary of War, 32;

Desertions from the Army, 33; Reform in the Army, 33; Reform in the Navy, 34; Reform in

Merchant Vessels, 35; Effects of Ardent Spirit on Seamen, 36; State of the Reformation at

the close of 1830, 38; Effects of one Man's using a Little daily, 39; Effects of another Man's

using None, 39; Drunkards reclaimed, 40; Great Benefits from small Expenditures, 41; Tes-

timony of Physicians, 42; Persons prevented from becoming Drunkards, 44; Expense of per-

suading Men to abstain from the Use of Ardent Spirit compared with the Expense of taking

Care of those who use it, 45; The Good which may be effected by $10,000, 45; Reasons why

more Drunkards are not reformed, 46; Established Principle of Law, 47; Testimony of Mer-

chants, 47; Principle of the Divine Government, 48; The great Hinderance to the Temperance

Reformation, 49; Belief the Churches, 50; Success of the Cause, 50; Publications on the

Immorality of the Traffic, 51; Progress of Reform in Foreign Countries, 52; Prospects of

Extending through the World, 52; Things to be avoided, 53; Dealers in Ardent Spirit in four

Cities, 53; Benefits of Temperance Societies, 55; Character of those who continue in the

Trafic, 56; Testimony of the New York State Committee, 57; Objections stated and answer-

ed, 50.

Resolutions and Address of American Temperance Society, 125; National Circular, 127; Cor-

responding Secretary, 128; Professor Ware's Testimony, 129; President Wayland's Inquiries,

129; President Fiske's Address to Church Members, 132; Dickinson's Advice, 133; Beecher's

Address to the Young Men of Boston, 134; Judge Daggett's Declaration, 135; Opinion of

Judge Cranch, 135; Injustice of the Traffic in Ardent Spirit, 136; The Rum-selling Church

Member, 137; Venders of Ardent Spirit in the City of Washington, 188; Confession of a Re-

tailer, 138; Wives murdered by their husbands, 159; Children murdered by their Fathers, 141;

Loss of the Rothsay Castle, 142; Commodore Biddle's Letter, 143; Letter from an Officer in

the Army, 144; Massachusetts Lunatic Asylum, 145; Demoralizing Effect of the Traffic in

Ardent Spirit, 146; Circular concerning Churches, 147; Connection between Temperance and

Religion, 149; Influence of Church Members who traffic in Ardent Spirit, 150; Testimony of

the British and Foreign Temperance Society, 151; The Great Obstruction to the Temperance

Reformation, 153; Churches in which are no Members in the Traffic, 155; Family Temperance

Societies, 155; Facts in the State of New York, 156; Tavern Keepers ruined, 150; Temper-

ance Taverns, and Groceries, 160; Progress of the Cause and its Results, 161; The Sabbath

the proper Time to speak upon it, 162; Duty of Ministers and Churches, 163, Temperance

Societies in Africa and the Sandwich Islands, 164; Conclusion, 165.

PART III.

Truths established in the last two Reports, 227; Number of copies printed in this country,

228; Testimony of distinguished men concerning them, 228; Object of those Reports, and of

the present, 229; Additional Agents, 230; Circular for Simultaneous Meetings, 231; Order

from the War Department, 235; Testimony of a distinguished Jurist, 235; Testimony of a

Mail Contractor, 226; Testimony of Thomas Jefferson, 237; Testimony of the Secretary of

the Navy, 238; Testimony of Naval Officers, 239; Bribery of Electors by Candidates for

office, 240; General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 241; General Assembly of

the Presbyterian Church, 242; General Association of New Hampshire, 243; General Asso-

ciations of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Maine, 244; American Quarterly Temperance

Magazine, 244: Cook's Speech at the Capitol in Washington, 246; Testimony of a European

writer, 248; Conduct of a Millwright, and of a Miller, 249; Doings of Legislatures, 250; Sale

of Ardent Spirit treated as immoral, 251; Churches free from traffickers in ardent spirit, 252 ;

A great Mistake, 255; Testimony of a gambler, and a vender of lottery tickers, 254; Temper-

ance efforts in the City of New York, 255; Circular for a United States Convention, 256;

Meeting at the Capitol in Washington, 257; Formation of the American Congressional Tem-

perance Society, 259; Simultaneous Meetings in Great Britain, 260; Address of John Wilks,

Esq. M. P., 260; Address of the Bishop of Chester, 261; Address of P. Crampton, Sol. Gen.

for Ireland, 262; English Temperance Magazine, 263; Insurance of Temperance ships, 264;

Drunkards ceasing to use intoxicating drinks, 265; The way to render reformation permanent,

269; The great hindrance to the Temperance Reformation, 270; License laws morally and

politically wrong, 271; License laws promote intemperance, 271; License laws injurious tə

the wealth of a nation, 272; Testimony of a country merchant, 274; Testimony of a city

merchant, 275; Amount lost by the traffic in ardent spirit, 276; Beneficial uses to which it

might be applied, 277; The traffic in spirit injurious to the public health, 278; The traffic in

spirit productive of Cholera, 281; The traffic in spirit injurious to intellect and to morals, 282;

Reasons why it produces such effects, 283; Obstacles to the Temperance Reformation, 286;

License laws vicious, 287; License laws without foundation, 288; License laws highly expen-

sive, 289; License laws detrimental to Agriculture, 291; Judge Platt's Opinion, 293; The

Turning Point, 294.

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APPENDIX.-Extracts from Gerrit Smith's Address, 300; Extracts from Judge Platt's A4-
dress, 305; Extracts from President Fisk's Address, 306; Laws of Massachusetts against Lot-
teries, and leiden pipes, 316; United States Temperance Convention, 317; Reasons for com-
plying with the Resolutions of the Convention, 325; Extracts of a letter from a gentleman at
Washington, 328; Constitution of the Am. Congressional Temp. Society, 329; Reduction of
Taxes, 330; Letter from a merchant in Alabama, 331; Letter from the Sandwich Islanda, 392;
Facts with regard to Catskill, 333; New York State Report, $38; General Association of
Massachusetts, 338; Laws which license the traffic in ardent spirit morally wrong, 338,

PART V.

Alcohol, the product of vinous fermentation, 455; The process of extracting it, 456; Opia-

ions of its Medical virtues, 457; Distilled liquor introduced as a drink, 458; Reasons why

men continue to drink it, 459; Reasons why they continue to increase the quantity, 461; The

way in which Alcohol causes death, 463; Its effects on infant children, 464; The testimony of

God, with regard to it, 465; Violation of principle, and its results, 467; Effects of Alcohol on

the soul, 469; Its production of pauperism and crime, 470; Its effects in counteracting the

efficacy of the Gospel, 472; Its polluting and hardening influence upon the heart, 473; State

of the Temperance Reformation in the U. S., 474; Do. in Great Britain, 475; Effects of abati-

nence from all intoxicating drinks, 476; J. S. Buckingham's statement, 484; Address to the

Drunkards of Great Britain, 485; Progress of Temperance in Sweden, 486; Do. in Russia,

Finland, and India, 487; Do. in Burmah and Sumatra, 488; Do. in Egypt, 489; Plan of future

operations, 491; Dr. Mussey's Prize Essay, 494; Experiments in the Auburn State Prison, 494;

Other experiments, 495; The best protection against diseases, 496; Effects of Alcohol on the

Cholera, 496; Testimony of Physicians to water, as the proper drink for man, 497; Testimony.

of sea-faring men, 500; Substitutes for Alcohol as a medicine, 501; Restoratives from sickness,

504; Extracts from Dr. Lindsly's Prize Essay, 507; Effects of Alcohol on children and on men,

507; Substitutes for ardent spirit, as a medicine, 509; In Dyspepsy and in low Typhoid states

of the system, &c. 511; Opinion of Drs. Sewall, and Warren, 513; Resolutions of the New

York State Temperance Society, 514.

INTRODUCTION.

THE great increase of drunkenness, within the last half century, among the people of the United States, led a number of philanthropic individuals, in the year 1825 to consult together, upon the duty of making more united, systematic, and extended efforts for the prevention of this evil. Its cause was at once seen to be, the use of intoxicating liquor; and its appropriate remedy, abstinence. It was also known, that the use of such liquor, as a beverage, is not only needless, but injurious to the health, the virtue, and the happiness of men. It was believed, that the facts which had been, and which might be collected, would prove this, to the satisfaction of every disinterested and candid mind; and that if the knowledge of them were universally disseminated it would, with the divine blessing, do much toward changing the habits of the nation. It was thought therefore to be proper to make the experiment. For this purpose, was formed on the 13th of February, 1826, THE AMERICAN TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. Its object is, by the diffusion of information, the exertion of kind moral influence, and the power of united, and consistent example, to effect such a change of sentiment and practice, that drunkenness and all its evils will cease; and temperance, with its attendant benefits to the bodies and souls of men, will universally prevail. This object the Society has now pursued for ten years; and the results of its efforts, are presented to the consideration of the community, in the subsequent volume. It is earnestly desired that a copy of this volume may be put into the hands of every Preacher, Lawyer, Physician, Magistrate, Officer of Government, Secretary of a Temperance Society, Teacher of youth, and educated young man, throughout the United States, and throughout the world.

The principles, facts, and reasonings contained in this volume, have special reference to Alcohol, in the form of distilled liquor; but they will apply to it, in every other form, in proportion to its quantity, the frequency with which it is used, and its power to produce intoxication; or derangement of the regular and healthy action of the Human System. The volume is divided into five parts, called Reports. These, however, are not so much Reports of the operations of the friends of Tenperance and their results, as Reports of Principles in the Government of God, as illustrated by facts, with regard to men, which show, that for them to continue to use ardent spirit as a beverage, is a violation of his laws; and will prove, by its consequences, that, "the way of transgressors is hard.”

The first part shows that it is immoral to drink such liquor; and the second that it is immoral to manufacture, vend, or furnish it, to be drank by others. The third part shows that the making, or continuing of laws which license men to sell ardent spirits to be used as a beverage, and thus teaching to the community that the drinking of it is right, and throwing over it the shield of legislative sanction and support, is also immoral. The fourth part, exhibits those principles of Divine Revelation, which the above mentioned practices violate; and the fifth part, shows the manner in which Alcohol, when used as a beverage, causes death to the bodies and souls of men.

Hundreds of thousands of persons of all ages, conditions and employments, in view of its evils, have ceased to use it; and so far as they or others can discover, have been greatly benefited by the change. Let all do the same, and drunkenness will universally and for ever cease. Pauperism, crime, sickness, insanity, wretchedness, and premature death, will, to a great extent, be prevented. Health, virtue and happiness will be increased; human life be prolonged; the gospel, through grace, be more widely extended, and generally embraced; God be more highly honored, and souls in greater numbers be illuminated, purified, and saved.

Each individual, therefore, into whose hand this volume may come, is most respectfully and earnestly entreated attentively to peruse it; and if he has not already done it, seriously to inquire whether it is not his duty to renounce for ever the use of intoxicating drink. He is also requested to communicate as extensively as possible the knowledge of the facts which the volume contains; and to labor, in all suitable ways, to induce all persons to exemplify its principles, by a united and consistent example.

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