Works of Thomas Hill Green: Philosophical works

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1898
 

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Its application by Kant to explain the meaning of the corre
25
The real then is real as conceived and the relations to sense
28
The partial error in Kants account of them is due to
29
As regards 1 it is only by false abstraction that we
31
He uses apprehension both for consciousness of sensation
35
Judgment is the thought of an object under relations
36
Spinozas error of regarding rights as possible apart from
38
Thus general propositions though if they concern nature
43
Time as the relation of succession is a permanent relation
44
E The relation of the mathematical to the dynamical
46
Ambiguity of their phrase state of nature They agree
52
Resemblance simultaneity and succession are not rightly
59
Its effects upon the individual 387
68
Is moral philosophy a branch of anthropology?
70
In what sense can the distinction between judgments
73
Problems to which he conceives that the process of know
76
As thus directly affected by the reason of the individual
82
And the point of the definition which owing to the primari
86
The distinction between the empirical and intelligible
96
Though there are cases in which in a different sense
97
And 6 does not correspond to the Kantian distinction
100
Kant himself supplies the means for getting rid of it
101
In such cases the truth generally is that the right on
103
Are some acts free others naturally determined ? or is
107
Some general questions which the good citizen may put
109
His conception of the function of unity in knowledge in
113
In his theory of syllogism Mill is right as against the theory
116
It is answered by an appeal to the voice of conscience
119
Nothing is really gained by ascribing it to reason
125
Such a treatment however would ignore the distinction
126
The third formulation of it
128
Mill does not draw the right distinction between descrip
132
This principle in activity is will Kants three defini
135
A right may be analysed into a claim of the individual upon
139
We must bear in mind that the only subject of moral valua
142
Desire for pleasure even if uniform could only give rise
151
Influences which have helped to break down these limita
153
LECTURES ON LOGIC
157
Or that 6 those who are killed have incurred the risk
159
But a formal thinking is not a real process of thought
163
If they really acted from desire to do good their share
165
This is equally true of conflicts arising from what are called
168
For here and now express relations only possible to
170
There are many conceptions e g moral ones which
174
The permanence of the psychical effects of registered feel
180
THE LOGIC OF J S MILL
195
And the punishment of crimes done in drunkenness illus
199
Kants doctrine that possibility of experience gives objec
246
Outline of remaining lectures on 1 rights connected with
247
The distinction between the necessity of mathematical
249
Time is the primary condition of all feelings as simply
256
In his opposition of knowing by our eyes to knowing
262
If inconceivable unbelievable in Mills sense
268
which he attacks
273
Misconceptions implied in Mills various accounts of induc
281
The ordinary view ignores the fact that resemblance implies
287
Thus neither was Keplers discovery an abstraction
293
Kants distinction between all bodies are extended and all
294
Scientific men who suppose themselves to adopt it really
299
Mill inconsistently holds that the relation of cause
305
moral
307
Hegels conception of freedom as objectively realised in
312
Thus the fact that a man being what he is must act in
318
LECTURES ON THE PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL OBLIGATION
334
Law then can only enjoin or forbid certain acts it cannot
343
B Spinoza
355
From such a status naturalis there is no possible transition
361
Spinoza however while insisting that man is part of naturė
364
To justify his doctrine of absolute submission he has
370
A possible object is either objectively possible in which
382
E Rousseau
386
Thus the government is never the same as the sovereign
390
Difficulties in this conception It seems that either no actual
396
This has been the case in ancient despotisms and in
405
Thus as to question 2 above sec 80 if sovereignty
411
VOL II
433
The point to be insisted on is that force has only formed
446
It is a further question when the attempt to get a law
455
All rights are personal but as a mans body is the con
461
It is not because states exist but because they do not fulfil 1
477
In fact the identification of patriotism with military aggres
482
The most rudimentary right of vengeance implies social
488
The popular indignation against a great criminal is
490
The idea that just punishment is that which the crime
496
There would be no reason in associating terror with breaches
505
The right of the state to promote morality
512
This influence will only be weakened by substituting for
514
Locke rightly bases the right of property on the same ground
522
Property whether regarded as the appropriation of nature
527
And further the masses crowded through these causes into
533
therefore reciprocal
536
The abolition of slavery is another essential to the develop
542
spond those virtues which maintain life against nature
550

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Passatges populars

Pàgina 556 - Ball. — HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE LEGISLATIVE SYSTEMS OPERATIVE IN IRELAND, from the Invasion of Henry the Second to the Union (1172-1800).
Pàgina 383 - To what gross absurdities the following of custom when reason has left it may lead, we may be satisfied when we see the bare name of a town, of which there remains not so much as the ruins, where scarce so much housing as a sheep-cote, or more inhabitants than a shepherd is to be found, sends as many representatives to the grand assembly of law-makers as a whole county numerous in people and powerful in riches.
Pàgina 556 - Chesney.— INDIAN POLITY: a View of the System of Administration in India. By General Sir GEORGE CHESNEY, KCB With Map showing all the Administrative Divisions of British India.
Pàgina 365 - And in him consisteth the essence of the commonwealth; which, to define it, is "one person, of whose acts a great multitude by mutual covenants one with another have made themselves every one the author, to the end he may use the strength and means of them all as he shall think expedient, for their peace and common defence.
Pàgina 398 - Every positive law, or every law simply and strictly so called, is set by a sovereign person, or a sovereign body of persons, to a member or members of the independent political society wherein that person or body is sovereign or supreme.

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