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alled are drawing to a speedy conclusion. despotism, and of all e&ablished abuses on The objects are there presented to the the other, to a beneficent purpose.'' view in so indistinct a form, that the most We ought to have noticed before, that penetrating eye can see men only as trees a republication has issued from the Clawalking."

rendon press of.“ Twenty-two Sermons" " A Commentary with Notes on part of on various fubjects, telected from the the Book of the Revelations of St. John, works of the celebrated Dr. Isaac Barrox. by the late. JouN SNODGRASS, D. D. The works of this great mathematician &c." The death of the author prevented and learned divine, however antiquated the completion of this work, which evinces the style, will always be respected for the much learning, piety, and ingenuity. The abundance and folidity of the matter interpretation of the Book of Prophecies which they contain. It is remarkable that has bewildered many a found theologian, the present volume is abruptly ushered in-s and crazed many a religious enthufiaft. to the world without preface, and without We coincided with the Right Rev. Au- advertisement. thor, whose opinion on this subject we Mr. Rowland Hill, on whose journal have juft taken the liberty of quoting. of a tour through the north of Eng

Mr. Gilpin, Vicar of Boldre, has land we animadverted in our last Retropublished a volume of plain pra&ical “Ser- spect, has provoked fome. “ Remarks" mons preached to a Country Congregation.” from Dr. John JAMIESON. Mr. Hill It has been the practice of this very ani- in his work introduced some severe obser.. able divine to take with him in his walks vations on the Secession Church of Scot2 memorandum book with a text or tuo land, and on the solemn League and Coof Scripture written in it.

Without in

venant, &c. to which Dr. Jamiefon bas cending to pursue his subje&t to any length, replied with much firmness and moderahe used 10 take down such reflctions as rion, much mildness and fagacity. The naturally flowed from it, and, on his re- Doctor has with great appearance of fucturn home, methodize and expand his cess, fastened on Mr. Hill the guilt of matter as was deemed necesary. This, misrepresentation : the charge is serious far from being a laborious and severe but the language in which it is conveyed employment, is rather an enlivening perfcétly becoming. Dr. Jamieson in the mode of study, which he strongly recom- course of his “ Remarks" combats the mends to the younger clergy; for whose arguments of his opponent in favor of instruction he has printed at the close of his itinerary and lay preaching, which, the volume a few “ Hints" taken from his Doctor thinks, have a tendency to low own memorandum book: “they are mere feeds of difunion and disorder. Mr. Row. sketches" says Mr. Gilpin, “ though per- LAND Hillin a pamphlet entitled “ Plea haps for that reason they have more spirit for Union, and for a free Propagation of than finished pieces.”

the Gospel," has published a very masterly “ The Libertine and Infidel led to Re- reply to Dr. Jamieson's Remarks and has fection, by calm_Expoftulation, &c. by vindicated lay preachers and itinerary John DUNCAN, D. D.” We know not preaching in a style which dues much hoof any work whose tendency is more di- nor to his zeal and acuteness. The conrectly to appease fe&tarian animosity than troversy between these polemic divines has this : the venerable divine who is the au- been very ably supported on both sides. thor of it, is most fincerely attached to the Mr. Hill has also published “ Extracts of the constitution and church as establithed in a Journal of a second Tour from London this country; ftill however he is not blind through the Highlands of Scotland, &c." to the abuses which exist in both of them, The Reverend R. POLWHELE has been and in the character of a true friend, is indiscreet enough to write two vulgar desirous for their total eradication. He “ Letters,” to the Reverend Dr. Hawke, listens not to idle tales of the growing who is branded as a canter, a crowde depravity of the present generation ; but catcher, &c. because, zealoully attached to encourages the Christian to believe that a the doctrines of the church of England, Pe-established and peaceable order of things he is more than commonly earneft in imis secretly advancing to maturity and un- pressing them on the minds of his au. foreseen perfection; and that an invisible dience. hand is directing alike the self-destructive The Reverend M. Clowes has pub. licence of the libertine, and rage of the lished “ Letters to a M. P. on the aparchist, on the one side, and the blind writings of Baron Swedenborg containing obstinacy of the bigot, and the adorer of a full and complete refutation of the Abbé.

Bar.

Barruel's calumnies against the honorable _The object of Mr. HARE in Ais Vijiauthor." That noted calumniator, the tation Serinon before the archdeacon of Abbé Barruel, is again breken upon the Glofter, is to extol the priesthood; not wheel : Mr. Clowes, in these letters, vin- merely their fpiritual functions, but their dicates with much energy and manly sense, emoluments and dignities. The nature the character and theology of Baron Swe- of this discourse may be collected from the denborg against the Abbé's gross misrepre- heads into which it is divided : the fentation. The author moreover expounds,. preacher labors to prove that an eftahin a very clear and satisfactory manner, lithed priesthood is so agreeable to the the whole Swedenborgian system, to nature and reason of man, that there is no which he feems most sincerely attached. instance of any civilized nation in which

"Minutiæ; or little Things for the Poor there has not been fuch an establishment. of Christ's Flock,” is an opusculum by Secondly, that it is expressly declared in Dr. PEERS; the quaintness of the title scripture, there shall be an established and prepares us for peculiarities in the per- permanent priesthcod. Thirdly, that in this formance, which is neither reinarkable nation the establishment of the priesthood for its excellence nor inferiority.

is not burdensome to the community, but .« Considerations on the Book of Genesis, otherwise ; and lastly, that such an estab. in a series of Letters," addressed to the lifhment has a natural tendency to increase bishop of Llandaff: unable to conquer the the temporal as well as fpiritual welfare chronological difficulties of this book and to of the people." reconcile its dates, the author of these let- The Clergy in a diftrict in the diocese ters gives it up as unworthy of belief. As of Lincoln, convened for the purpose of there is nothing pert nor indecorous in the considering the State of Religion in its manner of this writer, the learned prelare several parishes, have publithed their ro whom his work is addressed, may, per. " Report;” in which, after having stated haps be disposed to obviate his difficulties. the number of places of Worship, and the

Mr. PARKER has published “ Three various denominations of those who artend difcourses on the Lord's Supper, &c.” them, they have endeavoured to trace the there is no novelty in the arguments here causes of profaneness and irreligion, and adduced; on the contrary Mr. P. seems to guard the church and government of insufficiently acquainted with his subject. this kingdom as much as poffible against

Among the many fingle Sermons which the effects of them. The reporters seem have appeared, is to be diftinguithed for to have been very active and perfevering iss eloquence, Mr. Hall's on “Modern in their search, and in the remedies which Infidelity.” This gentleman in the early they have proposed have given high oifeace period of the French Revolution was one to fome mean-minded churchmen by their of those who distinguished themselves as lenity and liberality. champions in the cause of freedom; deep- Mr. Houlis has published “ An Apoly fenfibly of the atrocities with which logy for the Disbelief of revealed Religion." that event has been accompanied, he now 11 any apology be necessary for a diflooks upon it with a degree of horror on- belief of revealed religion, as this respectly to be paralleled by his former zcal and able infidel conceives it is, it hould be triumph on the occasion. We remem- offered to the throne of Heaven : we acber a publication of Mr. Hall's on the knowledge the jurifdi&tion of no earthly “ Freedom of the Press," which he per- tribunal in matters of religion. Belief is haps will not thank us for bringing to his an act not of volition, but necessity. recollection; it is a splendid composition, Whether the publication of a man's reaand railed high our expectations of the sons for disbelief requires an apology, is a present performance, which will not in different question ; at any rate we see pot any degree detract from the reputation as the use of such a pamphlet as the present, a writer which Mr. Hall very juftly ac- which has but little novelty of argument. quired. There are many parts of this The author of a pamphlet, entitled sermon to which we cannot in any degree “ Apeleutherus ; or an Effort to at 'affent ; as a compofition however, we are tain Intellectual Freedom," has divided charmed with its glowing di&tion, and its his work into three parts: in the two rich and various imagery.

first he attacks public worlhip and reli· Among the single Sermons we select as gious instruction: In the third part, on worthy of attention, both from its intereft. Christianity as a supernatural commuing fúbject and able execution. Mr. nication, he endeavours to show that, in DAUBENY'S on cruelty to dumb animals. Our fituation, it is not the miracles which

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prove the truth of the religion, but it is by the Bishop of Lincoln, the Evidences the truth of the religion which proves the of Christianity by the Bishop of Llandaff, miracles,

and Mr. Kett's able book on Prophecy, The Bishop of MEATH has published should be placed on bis Thelf by every a volume of “ Sermons preached on dif- parent who is desirous to instruct his chilferent Occasions; to which are added, dren in the religion of Jesus. Three Charges and a Circular Address

BIOGRAPHY. so the Clergy of the Diocese of Ossory on « Anecdotes of George Frederick Hanthe State of Ireland in the Year 1797. del, and of John Christopher Smith, with These Sermons are chiefly, it may almost select Pieces of Music composed by J. C. be said entirely, of a political 'nature; Smith, never before published." This and we are sorry, to remark in them a work presents us with but very few aneco spirit of intolerance and vulgar rage highly dotes of Handel that are new. Dr. Burunbecoming the character of a Christian ney took great pains to procure from teacher.

Germany what information could be colThe publication of a third volume of lected relative to the early life of that great " Family Sermons,” by Mr. WHITAKER, composer; what is added by the prefent has completed that gentleman's defign; biographer is less interesting than might which he has executed with considerable have been expected. The editor, howreputation to himself, and which is likely ever, explicitly tells us his design in the to be attended with benefit to others. present publication, namely, that its pro

“ Four Sermons” suited to the occasion hits may be appropriated to the use of the were preached at the 5th general meeting relations of Mr. Smith. This gentleman of the Missionary Society, by M. M. was the fon of John Christian Schmidt, FINLAY, TOZER, Moody, and Brod- who came over to England with Handel, BELT, and have fince been published. and continued to live with him nearly till To these sermons are subjoined the report the time of his death. Mr. Smith, the of the directors, &c. from which it ap- subject of the present biographical mepears that the labors of the Missionaries moir, received practical lessons from the have been hitherto attended with some great musician; and from the acquaintance success, and that each annual meeting of which he formed during his travels athe society has increased in zeal, vigor, broad, and was fortunate enough to preand unanimity. The following curious serve on his return to England, his maninformation occurs in the report of the di- ners were remarkably easy and polished. rectors: “ Our hopes, likewise, have been As a practitioner, his execution does not raised by an unexpected solicitation from seein to have been great ; nor as a General Bowles, who was providentially composer does his invention appear led to reside in London a few months, to strikingly original : his productions are fend missionaries to the vast nation of the pleasing and elegant. Two portraits, one Creek Indians, situated on the Gulf of of Handel, and one of Smith adorn this Mexico. Being one of the chiefs of that volume, which it is to be hoped will, by nation, and pleased, on inquiry, with the an extensive circulation, answer the intenobjects of our institution, he promised to tions of the editor. lay the matter before a national council " Some Brief Memoirs" have been on his return, and favor us immediately published “ of the Life of David Hall, with the result. Should his proposal be with an Account of the Life of his Fagenerally approved by them, we trust ther, John Hall." David Hall was one of you will empower the directors to accept the people called Quakers, who, by bis the invitation, and send whatever number talents and industry acquired a confideraof perfons may appear best suited for the ble eminence among them. The present work.'

little volume will be read not without The last publication which we think it fome interest, probably not without įmnecessary to mention in this theological provement. department, (for we do not think neces- We have been much entertained in the fary, nor have we room, to mention every perutal of two volumes translated from pamphlet and single sermon which ap- the French, of “ Memoirs of Hippolite pears) is “ A Summary of the Principal Clairon.” This actress was for many Evidences for the Truth and Divine Ori. years very justly admired on the Parisian gio of the Christian Revelation,” by theatre : The has long retired from the BEILBY, Lord Bishop of London. This stage; and though almost in her 8oth year, is a molt valuable work, and together retains sufficient intellect, and has summonwith the Elements of Christian Theology, cd fufficient vigor and resolution to be her

self

Barruel's calumnies against the honorable -The object of Mr. Hare in his Vif author." That noted calumniator, the tation Serinon before the archdeacon Abbé Barruel, is again broken upon the Glofter, is to extol the priesthood; wheel : Mr. Clowes, in these letters, vin- merely their spiritual functions, but : dicates with much energy and manly fenfe, emoluments and dignities. The the character and theology of Baron Swe- of this discourse may be collected frc denborg against the Abbé's gross misrepre- heads into which it is divided fentation. The author moreover expounds, preacher labors to prove " that ar in a very clear and satisfactory manner, lished priesthood is so agreeable the whole Swedenborgian system, to nature and reason of man, that th which he seems most sincerely attached. instance of any civilized nation

“Minutiæ; or little Things for the Poor there has not been such an eftai of Christ's Flock," is an opusculum by Secondly, that it is expressly Dr. Peers; the quaintnefs of the title scripture, there shall be an esta prepares us for peculiarities in the per- permanent priesthcod. Thirdly formance, which is neither reinarkable nation the establishment of e for its excellence nor inferiority.

is not burdensome to the com “ Confiderations on the Book of Genesis, otherwise ; and lastly, that! in a series of Letters," addrefled to the lifhinent has a natural tende bishop of Llandaff: unable to conquer the the temporal as well as fi chronological difficulties of this book and to of the people.". reconcile its dates, the author of these let. The Clergy in a diftric ters gives it up as unworthy of belief. As of Lincoln, convened for there is nothing pert nor indecorous in the considering the State of manner of this writer, the learned prelate several parishes, have oo whom his work is addressed, may, per. “ Report;" in which, a haps be disposed to obviate his difficulties. the number of places of

Mr. PARKER has published “ Three various denominations « discourses on the Lord's Supper, &c.” them, they have ende there is no novelty in the arguments here causes of profaneness adduced; on the contrary Mr. P. seems to guard the church insufficiently acquainted with his subject. this kingdom as muc

Among the many fingle Sermons which the effects of them. have appeared, is to be diftinguithed for to have been very ac is eloquence, Mr. Hall's on “ Modern in their search, and Infidelity." This gentleman in the early they have proposed ! period of the French Revolution was one to lome mean-mind

SVO TOof those who distinguished theinfelves as leniry and liberalit: champions in the cause of freedom; deep

a descrip

Mr. Hollis hi ly fenfibly of the atrocities with which logy for the Difbel

„Jits, indigethat event has been accompanied, he now

limate of Great li any apology

ral and fpecińc looks upon it with a degree of horror on- belief of reveales' ly to be paralleled by his former zcal and able infidel conc

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time of lowering triumph on the occasion. We remem- offered to the th

thele volumes, ber a publication of Mr. Hall's on the knowledge the « Freedom of the Press,” which he per- tribunal in mar haps will not thank us for bringing to his an act not o

Lingzan language recollection; it is a splendid composition, Whether the and railed high our expectations of the sons for disbe! present performance, which wili not in different queft any degree detract from the reputation as the use of fu a writer which Mr. Hall very justly ac- which has bu quired. There are many parts of this The auth fermon to which we cannot in any degree « Apeleuth 'affent ; as a compofition however, we are tain Inrelle charmed with its glowing diction, and its his work i rich and various imagery.

firft he att - Among the single Sermons we select as gious inftr

- xe, gia worthy of attention, both from its interest- Christiani: ing fubject and able execution. Mr. nication, DAUBENY's on cruelty to dumb animals. Our fituar

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in which Uge of ches ural philofohis capacious thed. It will should give the the original forof its subsequent e can only say, in · author seems parcw the reconciliation .cology teaches with ht in the Mofaic hilrtion of the Huttonian of the Volcanists. idro indebted to Mr. KIR

valuable “ Elsay on the neral Waters." To ascerdients, and proportions of .cnts, which enter into the of mineral waters, has often

kill of the acuteft chemists alogists. The art of analyling

very imperfectly known. Mr. -ver, on this, as on every other which employs his attention, has considerable light. After having some general remarks on the ennent which has taken place within aft twenty years of the boundaries of nical science, and of the improvements particular which have been made in recct to the analysation of mineral waters, e thus unfolds the object of his publicaLion : “ To ftare, add to, and generalize these improvements, by proposing new tests, and new limitations of the powers of those already known, in cases where none were before determined, or where

they were inaccurately afligned; also by lo fubstituting more direct methods of inom vestigation, to the random methods before va- employed, and various new modes of efti.

mating the quantity of each of the suba at he stances discovered, is the purpose of the or of following theets.'

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