The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volum 3

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Tourneisen, 1787 - 403 pàgines
 

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Pàgina 75 - In the despatch of business his diligence was indefatigable ; and the active powers of his mind were almost continually exercised in reading, writing, or meditating, in giving audience to ambassadors, and in examining the complaints of his subjects.
Pàgina 78 - A mind thus relaxed by prosperity and indulgence, was incapable of rising to that magnanimity which disdains suspicion, and dares to forgive. The deaths of Maximian and Licinius may perhaps be...
Pàgina 9 - We are at present qualified to view the advantageous position of Constantinople, which appears to have been formed by nature for the centre and capital of a great monarchy. Situated in the forty-first degree of latitude, the imperial city commanded, from her seven hills, the opposite shores of Europe and Asia.
Pàgina 10 - Borysthenes; whatsoever was manufactured by the skill of Europe or Asia; the corn of Egypt, and the gems and spices of the farthest India, were brought by the varying winds into the port of Constantinople, which, for many ages, attracted the commerce of the ancient world.
Pàgina 76 - ... foes of the republic. He loved glory as the reward, perhaps as the motive, of his labours.
Pàgina 279 - Alexandria was patient of labour, jealous of fame, careless of safety ; and, although his mind was tainted by the contagion of fanaticism, Athanasius displayed a superiority of character and abilities, which would have qualified him, far better than the degenerate sons of Constantine, for the government of a great monarchy.
Pàgina 77 - Constantine we may contemplate a hero, who had so long inspired his subjects with love and his enemies with terror, degenerating into a cruel and dissolute monarch, corrupted by his fortune, or raised by conquest above the necessity of dissimulation.
Pàgina 263 - It is a thing,'' says Hilary, "equally deplorable and dangerous, that there are as many creeds as opinions among men, as many doctrines as inclinations, and as many sources of blasphemy as there are faults among us; because we make creeds arbitrarily, and explain them as arbitrarily. The Homoousion is rejected, and received, and explained away by successive synods.
Pàgina 208 - ... of the readers has much more frequently been insulted by fiction. Every event, or appearance, or accident, which seems to deviate from the ordinary course of nature, has been rashly ascribed to the immediate action of the Deity; and the astonished fancy of the multitude...
Pàgina 216 - As he gradually advanced in the knowledge of truth, he proportionably declined in the practice of virtue ; and the same year of his reign in which he convened the council of Nice was polluted by the execution, or rather murder, of his eldest son.

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