Imatges de pàgina
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from the hand of your God; for which you are accountable to him.-Consider them as given to engage your love and obedience to him; and oh! study to make suitable returns therefor. not be so ungrateful, so provoking, as to consume these good things upon your lusts. Look not upon the common blessings and delights of life, as sure and stable, fit to build your hopes upon ; but while you thankfully receive, and fruitfully improve them, give all diligence to secure that better part, which shall never be taken away from you.

Content not yourselves without an interest in the benefits of Christ's purchase; without a share in God's everlasting love.

I ask your patience, my hearers, a few minutes longer; while I congratulate our friends who have been called forth to jeopard their lives, in the wilderness, the summer past, upon their arrival at their homes again.--My brethren and neighbors, I heartily bid you welcome to your friends and habitations again, and sincerely rejoice with you, and your friends, in your safe return.

You are sensible, beyond what I can tell you, of the dangers, hardships and difficulties, which you have passed through; and I hope you are not insensible who has supported and upheld you, has defended you from the sword and the pestilence, by which some of your companions have been cut off. You have experienced the distinguishing goodness of God : Certainly then it will be vastly ungrateful in you to forget it, or not to endeavor to render to him according to the benefits done unto you. In the spring of the year, when you were about to take leave of your friends, and go forth into the public service, I trust you were ready to say, as Jacob when setting out for Padan-aran; Gen. xxviii. 20, 21. “If God will be with me, and keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on; so that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the Lord be my

I believe some of you had such serious thoughts, and made such solemn resolutions : And now you see the goodness of God in preserving you ; he has performed the thing, which you sought to him for, which you trusted in biin for. Oh then be not so ungrateful as to forget the performance of your vows. Take the Lord for your God and portion ; devote yourselves unfeignedly to him and his service : love, honor and obey him as your God; and trust in his mercy, through the blood of the great sacrifice, for the pardon of your sins, and a title to eternal happiness.

Finally, let us all meditate upon the mercies of God in the year past, both public and private—and how great is their sum! May our gratitude therefor, be such as he will accept. Let us manifest a deep sense of the goodness of God, and of our obligations to him, by a cheerful obedience to his will; for indeed, the exhortation which has often been urged upon you, to live as well as speak the praises of God, is very significant, and vastly important: “ They that offer” such “praise, glorify God, and they that” thus “order their conversation aright," may hope to “see yet more of the salvation of God.”

Let us now go from the house of God, and partake of the bounties of his providence, with joy and thankfulness, with sobriety and temperance. Let us bless our households, and endeavor to walk in our houses with a perfect heart, resolving that we will serve the Lord. Thus may we be persuaded by the mercies of God, to present our bodies and spirits living sacrifices, holy and acceptable unto God, which is but our reasonable service.

Now to that God who is daily loading us with benefits, and crowning us with loving kindness and tender mercies, be glory and honor, thanksgiving and praise everlasting. AMEN.

S E R M O N

PREACHED TO THE

ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY

IN BOSTON, NEW ENGLAND, JUNE 1, 1761,

BEING THE

ANNIVERSARY

OF THEIR

ELECTION OF OFFICERS.

BY JASON HAVEN, A. M.

PASTOR OF THE FIRST CHURCH IN DEDHAM.

BOSTON, N. E.:

PRINTED AND SOLD BY EDES AND GILL.

SE R M O N.

PROVERBS xvi. 32.

“ He that is slow to anger, is better than the mighty: and he that ruleth his spirit,

than he that taketh a city."

The author of these proverbs appears to have been greatly acquainted with men, and deeply studied in civil policy. He knew the springs of action in the human mind, and how to touch them in the most delicate manner. He possessed in a superior degree, “the wisdom from above, which is pure and peaceable.” In answer to his judicious prayer, God gave him “a wise and understanding heart.” Some valuable fruits of his wisdom may be gathered by us, if we duly attend to his important maxims, and the excellent rules for the government of our hearts and lives, which are scattered through his writings. In them, vulgar errors are corrected; false greatness is discovered; and the way to true honor and happiness marked out.

The verse, which is to be the foundation of our present discourse, teaches us to judge properly of actions and characters; instructs us not to be dazzled with those that wear the false glitter of heroism and magnanimity, while we overlook those that are truly noble and important, in " the judgment which is according to truth.” “He that is slow to anger, is better than the mighty: and he that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh a city."

In discoursing from these words, I shall endeavor—To open and explain the characters which we find in them—To compare them together, that we may see how much preferable the one is to the other—And to animate all to pursue them with a zeal proportionate to their respective importance.

In speaking of these points, some things may be said not altogether foreign to the present occasion.

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