Imatges de pàgina
PDF
EPUB

A FIG FOR MOMUS.

I AM indebted to my friend Mr. G. Chalmers for an opportunity of describing the following most rare and curious work.

This I presume to be the first Collection of Satires, so nained and intended in the English lavguage. This work Warton had never seen, and what his indefatigable research had not discovered, cannot be of every days occurrence. In his Catalogue of English Satirists, Warton gives precedence to Hall, but Halls Toothlesse Satyrs, Poetical, Academical, Moral, were published in 1597. Meres observes, “As Horace, Lucilius, Juvenal, Persius and Lucullus are, the best for Satyre among the Latins, so with us in the same faculty, these are chiefe: Piers Plowman, Lodge, Hall of Emanual Colledge in Cambridge, the author of PIGMA LIONS IMAGE, &c.” Commenting on this passage, Warton says, (see the sheets of the fourth volume which were printed, p. 80.) “I have never seen Lodges Satires, unless his ALARUM AGAINST USURERS, containing tried experiences against worldly abuses, and its Appendix, his History of Forbonius and Prisænia, may

be considered under that character.” I now therefore preceed to describe this literary curiosity.

" A FIG FOR MOMUS,"

CONTAINING Pleasant Varietie, included in Satyres, Eclogues and Epistles, by T. L. of Lincolns Inne, Gent.

At London; for Clement Knight, and are to bee solde at his Shop at the Little North Doore of Pauls Church. 1595."

It is inscribed “To the right honourable and thrice renowned Lord William, Earle of Darbie."

When the early period is considered, at which these Satires were written, the reader will naturally be surprised at the extraordinary ease and melody of the verse. I give the first Satire at length.

TO MASTER E. DIG.

SATYRE 1

Digbie, whence comes it that the world begins
To winke at follies, and sooth up (1) sinnes ?
Can other reason be alleadged than this ?
The world sooths sinne because it sinfull is.
The man that lives by bribes and usurie
Winkes like a foxe at lothsome letcherie.
Craft gives ambition leave to lay bis plot,
And crosse his friend because he (2) soundes him nota
All men are willing with the world to haulte (3)
But no man takes delight to knowe his faulte.
He is a gallant fit to serve my Lord,
Which clawes and sooths him up at every word,

That

[ocr errors]

A FIG FOR MOMUS.

I AM indebted to my friend Mr. G. Chalmers for an opportunity of describing the following most rare and curious work.

This I presume to be the first Collection of Satires, so named and intended in the English language. This work Warton had never seen, and what his indefatigable research bad not discovered, cannot be of every days occurrence. In his Catalogue of English Satirists, Warton gives precedence to Hall, but Halls Toothlesse Satyrs, Poetical, Academical, Moral, were published in 1597. Meres observes, As Horace, Lucilius, Juvenal, Persius and Lucullus are, the best for Satyre among the Latins, so with us in the same faculty, these are chiefe: Piers Plowman, Lodge, Hall of Emanual Colledge in Cambridge, the author of PIGMALIONS IMAGE, &c.” Commenting on this passage, Warton says, (see the sheets of the fourth volume which were printed, p. 80.) “ I have never seen Lodges Satires, unless his ALARUM AGAINST USURERS, containing tried experiences against worldly abuses, and its Appendix, his History of Forbonius and Prisænia, may be considered under that character.”

I now therefore preceed to describe this liicrary curiosity.

" A FIG FOR MOMƯS,"

CONTAINING Pleasant Varietie, included in Satyres, Eclogues änd Epistles, by T. L. of Lincolns Inne, Gent.

At London, for Clement Knight, and are to bee solde at his Shop at the Little North Doore of Pauls Church. 1595."

It is inscribed "To the right honourable and thrice renowned Lord William, Earle of Darbie."

When the early period is considered, at which these Satires were written, the reader will naturally be surprised at the extraordinary ease and melody of the verse. I give the first Satire at length

TO MASTER E. DIG.

SATYRE ) Digbie, whence comes it that the world begins To winke at follies, and sooth up (1) sinnes ? Can other reason be alleadged than this? The world sooths sinne because it sinfull is. The man that lives by bribes and usurie Winkes like a foxe at lothsome letcherie. Craft gives ambition leave to lay his plot, And crosse his friend because he (2) soundes him not. All men are willing with the world to haulte (3) But no man takes delight to knowe his faulte. He is a gallant fit to serve my Lord, Which clawes and sooths him up at every word,

I 2

That

A FIG FOR MOMUS.

I AM indebted to my friend Mr. G. Chalmers for an opportunity of describing the following most rare and curious work.

This I presume to be the first Collection of Satires, so nained and intended in the English language. This work Warton had never seen, and what his indefatigable research had not discovered, cannot be of every days occurrence. In his Catalogue of English Satirists, Warton gives precedence to Hall, but Halls Toothlesse Satyrs, Poetical, Academical, Moral, were published in 1597. Meres observes, " As Horace, Lucilius, Juvenal, Persius and Lucullus are, the best for Satyre among the Latins, so with us in the same faculty, these are chiefe: Piers Plowman, Lodge, Hall of Emanual Colledge in Cambridge, the author of PIGMA LIONS IMAGE, &c.” Commenting on this passage, Warton says, (see the sheets of the fourth volume which were printed, p. 80.) “ I have never seen Lodges Satires, unless his ALARUM AGAINST Usurers, containing tried experiences against worldly abuses, and its Appendix, his History of Forbonius and Prisænia, may be considered under that character.”

I now therefore preceed to describe this lin terary curiosity.

« AnteriorContinua »