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THE

USE OF THE VOICE

IN

READING AND SPEAKING:

:

A MANUAL

FOR

CLERGYMEN AND CANDIDATES FOR HOLY ORDERS.

BY

THE REV. FRANCIS T. RUSSELL, M. A.,
LEOTURER IN ELOCUTION AT THE GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, NEW YORK, AND AT

TIE BERKELEY DIVINITY SCHOOL, CONNECTICUT, ETC.

NEW YORK :
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,

1, 3, AND 5 BOND STREET.

1883.

COPYRIGHT BY

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,

1883.

PREFACE.

The following treatise records the results of some thirty years of study and observation in the expressive uses of the voice. During that time the author has had experience, both as a clergyman and as an instructor in elocution. It has been prepared in the sincere hope that it may be of use to the Clergy and Candidates for Orders in the discharge of Divine Service.

Part I. contains exercises in vocal drill, with the statement of some of the principles of elocution, which will be found serviceable to every clergyman, if reduced to practice. The author is emboldened to make this assertion from the testimonials of many pupils, who have been brought out of imperfections in speech, and have attained to eminence as public speakers by drill of this character.

Part II. treats of the reading of the Service throughout-specifically, to a large extent, with such general directions as will cover the reading of the remainder. It might seem presumptuous, when there is so wide divergence of practice in the manner of celebrating Divine Service, for any single clergyman to attempt to suggest how the Liturgy of the Church should be read. Yet, while recognizing the value of all the musical methods, in their proper place and time, whether by monotoning, intoning, or making it purely choral, there is still much use for the ordinary speaking voice. The necessities of the case, indeed, for want of musical skill and appropriate accompaniment, generally compel the Clergy to depend upon this method. It becomes, then, simply a question whether it shall be well or ill used in public worship. The effort has been made, in this part of the work, to secure the expressive and appropriate reading of the various divisions of the Divine Service. Part III. treats of the subject of manner.

The essential elements which constitute an effective delivery are here discussed, in the hope of securing a correct standard of pulpit elocution, adapted to the nature of the sacred office and the character of its theme-free from all mannerism, affectation, and artificiality.

The author has undertaken this work at the solicitation, and with the encouragement, of many friends and pupils, and has been greatly indebted to Mr. Melville K. Bailey in preparing it for the press.

If the treatise shall aid, in any way, in making the Service more effective, and if it shall increase the usefulness of any of his brethren, the author will gratefully esteem it privileged labor that he has done.

F. T. R August 1, 1882.

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PRIMARY CONDITIONS OF VOCAL POWER

Physical health—Fresh air—Proper protection-Warmth-Rest

-Mental quiet-Further considerations-Diet-Cold water-Con-
diments—Exercise-Walking-Caution against over-exertion.

CHAPTER II.

BREATHING EXERCISES

Preliminary remarks-Tidal breath-First series, with refer-

ence to complete airing of the lungs-Second series, with refer-

ence to the vocalchords-Third series, with reference to the uvula

-Fourth series, muscular exercises combined with breathing-

Cautions.

CHAPTER III.

ARTICULATION

How differing from apparently synonymous terms—Will power

-Drill exercises-Rate of vibrations--Effects of professional life
-Defects in speech-Further drill exercises-Result of neglect
-Faults found in reading the exhortation-Further defects—In
the sentences—In Scripture-Initial “h”—Difficult combina-
tions—Example—Table of elements.

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