Imatges de pÓgina
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

*

*

Mav drawe the plyant king which way I please.
Madc and poetry are his delight;
Therefore I'll have Italian masques by night,
Sweet speeches, comedies, and plealing thewes.
And in day, when he shall walke abroad,
Lke {ylvan Nymphs my pages shall he clad,
My men like Satyrs, grazing on the lawnes,
Shall with their goal-feet dance the antick hay.
Sometimes a Louely Boy, in Dian's shape (a),
With haire that gildes the water as it glides,
Crownets of pearle about his naked armes,
And in his sportfull handes an oliue tree,
Shall bathe him in a spring: and there hard by,
One, lyke A&teon, peeping through the groue,
Shall by the angry goddess be transforın'd.

Such thinges as these best please his majestie.”
The Iliad of Homer was tran. lar objection, perhaps not totally
flated by George Chapman to groundless, that he consulted the
wards the latter end of this reign, prose Latin version more than the
Mr. Warton's account of this Greek original. He says, sensi-
poet is as follows.

bly enough, “ it is the part of “ In the Preface, he declares “euery knowing and iudicious that the last twelve books were " interpreter, not to follow the translated in fifteen weeks: yet “ number and order of words, but with the advice of his learned and « the materiall things themselues, valued friends, Master Robert" and sentences to weigh diliHews (6), and Master Harriots. “ gently; and to clothe and a. It is certain that the whole per- 66 dorne them with words, and formance betrays the negligence

66 such a stile and forme of ora. of haste. He pays his acknow- « tion, as are most apt for the ledgements to his 6 most ancient, “ language into which they are “ learned, and right noble friend, 66 conuerted.” The danger lies, Master Richard Stapilton (c), in too lavish an application of this " the first most desertful mouer sort of cloathing, that it may not 66 in the frame of our Homer.” disguise what it should only adorn. He endeavours to obviate a popu- I do not say that this is Chapman's

(a) That is, acting the part of Diana.

(6) This Robert Hues, or Hibus, was a scholar, a good geographer and mathematician, and published a Tract in Latin on the Globes, Lond. 1593, 8vo. With other pieces in that way. There was allo a Robert Hughes who wrote a Dictionary of the Erglish and Perfic. See Wood, ATH. Oxon.i. 571. Hist. ANTIQUIT. UNIV. Oxon. Lib. ii. p. 288. b.

(c) Already mentioned as the publisher of a poetical miscellany in 1593. Supr. p. 401. “ The spirituall poems or hy.nnes of R. S.”are entered to ]. Busbic, Oct. 17, 1595. REGISTR. STATION.C.fol. 3. b.

[merged small][ocr errors]

fault ; but he has by no means re- published the Odysea, which he presented the dignity or the fim- dedicated to Carr Earlof Somerset. plicity of Homer. He is sometimes In addition to the antient authors paraphrastic and redundant, but of Greece and Rome, translations more frequently retrenches or im- of most of the Italian poets into poverishes what he could not feel English took place towards the and express. In the mean time, close of this century. Ariosto, he labours with the inconvenience the tales of Boccafe, Bandello, and ofan aukward, in harmonious, and of other Italian authors, were unheroic measure, imposed by translated into our language, and custom, but disgustful to modern became the foundation of many ears. Yet he is not always with- of the works of Shakespear, Dryout strength or spirit. He has en- den and others. Whatever could riched our language with many enrich, or furnifh with matter compound epithets, so much in our future poets, was now showthe manner of Homer, such as ered down upon them with unthe silver.footed Thetis, the silver- common exuberance. Our lanthroned. Juno, the triple-featbered guage was considerably improved, helme, the bigh-walled Thebes, the beauties of antient literature the faire-haired boy, the silver- were studied and copied with sucflowing floods, the hugely peopled cess, the works of the modern towns, the Grecians navy-bound, classics, if I may so call them, the

strong-winged lance, and many were laid open to our ancestors et in more which might be collected. medium proferuntur, and finally our Dryden reports, that Waller never poetry was arrived at that point, could read Chapman's Homerwith- when she had neither contracted out a degree of transport. Pope the severity of age, nor was so is of opinion, that Chapman co- much a child as to be pleased most vers his defects « by a daring with what was most strange and “ fiery spirit that animates his unnatural. “ translation, which is fomething As a considerable part of the “ like what one might imagine last section of this volume, con“ Hoiner himself to have writtaining a general view and cha66 before he arrived to years of racter of the poetry of Queen Elion discretion." But his fire is zabeth's age, is inserted in antoo frequently darkened, by that other part of our Register for this sort of fuftian which now disfi. year*, we shall not touch upon it gured the diction of our tragedy.” here. . Chapman also, in the year 1614,

* See p. 141. of this last part

THE

[ocr errors]

*

*

May drawe the plyant king which way I please.
Mufc and poetry are his delight;
Therefore I'll have Italian masques by night,
Sweet speeches, comedies, and pleasing thewes.
And in day, when he shall walke abroad,
Like sylvan Nymphs my pages shall be clad,
My men like Satyrs, grazing on the lawnes,
Shall with their goat-feet dance the antick hay.
Sometimes a Louely Boy, in Dian's shape (a),
With haire that gildes the water as it glides,
Crownets of pearle about his naked armes,
And in his sportfull handes an oliue tree,
Shall bathe him in a spring: and there hard by,
One, lyke Acteon, peeping through the groue,
Shall by the angry goddess be transforınd.

Such thinges as these best please his majestie.” The Iliad of Homer was tran- lar objection, perhaps not totally dlated by George Chapman to groundless, that he consulted the wards the latter end of this reign, prose Latin version more than the Mr. Warton's account of this Greek original. He says, sensipoet is as follows.

bly enough, “ it is the part of " In the Preface, he declares euery knowing and iudicious that the last twelve books were us interpreter, not to follow the translated in fifteen weeks: yet 6 number and order of words, but with the advice of his learned and " the materiall things themselues, valued friends, Master Robert 66 and sentences to weigh diliHews (b), and Master Harriots. gently; and to clothe and a. It is certain that the whole per- 6 dorne them with words, and formance betrays the negligence

« such a stile and forme of ora. of haste. He pays his acknow- e tion, as are most apt for the ledgements to his most ancient, “ language into which they are “ learned, and right noble friend, “ conuerted."

conuerted.” The danger lies, Master Richard Stapilton (c), in too lavish an application of this 66 the first most desertful mouer sort of cloathing, that it may not “ in the frame of our Homer.” disguise what it should only adorn. He endeavours to obviate a popu- I do not say that this is Chapman's (a) That is, acting the part of Diana.

) This Robert Hues, or Hifius, was a scholar, a good geographier and mathematician, and published a Tract in Latin on the Globes, Lond. 1593, 8vo. With other pieces in that way. There was allo a Robert Hughes who wrote a Dictionary of the English and Perfic. See Wood, ATH. Oxon.i. 571. Hist. ANTIQUIT. UNIV. Oxon. Lib. ii. p. 288. b.

(c) Already mentioned as the publisher of a poetical miscellany in 1593. Supr. p. 401. “ The spirituall poems or hymnes of R. S.” are entered to ]. Bulbie, Oct. 17, 1595. REGISTR. STATION.C. fol. 3. b.

fault;

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

fault; but he has by no means re- published the Odyssea, which he presented the dignity or the fim- dedicated to Carr Earlof Somerset. plicity of Homer. He is sometimes In addition to the antient authors paraphrastic and redundant, but of Greece and Rome, translations more frequently retrenches or im- of most of the Italian poets into poverishes what he could not feel English took place towards the and express. In the mean time, close of this century. Ariosto, he labours with the inconvenience the tales of Boccase, Bandello, and ofan aukward, inharmonious, and of other Italian authors, were unheroic measure, imposed by translated into our language, and custom, but disgustful to modern became the foundation of many ears. Yet he is not always with of the works of Shakespear, Dryout strength or spirit. He has en- den and others. Whatever could riched our language with many enrich, or furnifh with matter compound epithets, so much in our future poets, was now showthe manner of Homer, such as ered down upon them with unthe filver-footed Thetis, the filver. common exuberance. Our lantbroned Juno, the triple-featured guage was considerably improved, helme, the bigh-walled Thebes, the beauties of antient literature the faire-haired boy, the filver- were studied and copied with sucflowing floods, the bugely peopled cess, the works of the modern towns, the Grecians navy-bound, classics, if I may so call them, the strong-winged lance, and many were laid open to our ancestorset in

, more which might be collected. medium proferuntur, and finally our Dryden reports, that Waller never poetry was arrived at that point, could read Chapman's

Homerwith. when she had neither contracted out a degree of transport. Pope the severity of age, nor was so is of opinion, that Chapman co- much a child as to be pleased moit vers his defects 56 by a daring with what was most strange and

fiery spirit that animates his unnatural.

translation, which is fomething As a considerable part of the “ like what one might imagine last section of this volume, con66 Homer himself to have writtaining a general view and cha. 66 before he arrived to years of racter of the poetry of Queen Elia discretion." But his fire is zabeth's age, is inserted in antoo frequently darkened, by that other part of our Register for this sort of fuftian which now disfic year*, we shall not touch upon it gured the diction of our tragedy.” here..

Chapman also, in the year 1614,

* See p. 141. of this last parto

THE THE

[blocks in formation]

Retrospective view of affairs in America and the West Indies, in the

year 1780. State of the hostile armies on the side of New York,
previous to, and at the arrival of, Gen. Sir Henry Clinton from
the reduction of Charles Town. Short Campaign in the Jersies,

Connecticut

« AnteriorContinua »