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A

GRAMMAR OF ELOCUTION;

CONTAINING

THE PRINCIPLES

OF THE

ARTS OF READING AND SPEAKING;

ILLUSTRATED BY APPROPRIATE

EXERCISES AND EXAMPLES,

ADAPTED TO COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND PRIVATE INSTRUCTION:

THE WHOLE ARRANGED IN THE ORDER IN WHICH

IT IS TAUGHT IN YALE COLLEGE.

BY JONATHAN BARBER,
MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS, LONDON.

" A full knowledge of the PRINCIPLES and Practice of an art ena-
bles an industrious and ambitious votary to approach perfection ;
whilst idle followers are contented with the defaults of imitation.”

Rush's Philosophy of the Human Voice.

NEW-HAVEN,

PUBLISHED BY A. H. MALTBY.

B234 gr

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DISTRICT OF CONNECTICUT, SS. me BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the ninth day of L.S. December, in the fifty-fourth year of the independence

m of the United States of America, JONATHAN BARBER, of the said District hath deposited in this Office the title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author in the words following-to wit : " A Grammar ef Elocution, containing the principles of the Arts of Speaking and Reading, illustrated by appropriate exercises and examples, adapted to colleges, schools, and private instruction, the whole arranged in the order in which it is taught in Yale College. By Jonathan Barber."

In conformity to the Act of Congress of the United States, entitled “ an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and also to the act, entitled " an act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of Maps, charts, and books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other prints."

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Glerk of the District of Connecticut. A true copy of Record examined and sealed by me,

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the District of Connecticut

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TO JAMES RUSH, M. D.

PHILADELPHIA.

DEAR SIR,

66

The treatise which you published in 1827, entitled the Philosophy of the Human Voice,” was the first work that ever presented a true and comprehensive record of the vocal functions. Physiology is a science, the details of which, are discoverable only by observation and experiment. The history of the functions of the voice, is a legitimate department of that science, and you have investigated it in the only true method. Your work is strictly inductive : its philosophical principle is therefore correct. It combines, at the same time, such fullness of detail, with such an orderly classification of the vocal functions, as to entitle your views of the subject, on the ground both of the comprehensiveness of the particulars, and the felicity of the arrangement, to the denomination of A SCIENCE. Much less originality, depth, and accuracy of investigation, devoted to some art which mankind in general have been taught to consider profitable, would have brought you a more immediate recompense of fame; not however, perhaps, a larger portion of ultimate glory. As to the practical tendency

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of your treatise, I would observe that it satisfied my curiosity, as to the elements of the art which I teach, and enlarged to so great an extent my resources as a teacher, that the advantages I am constantly deriving from it, of themselves prompt me to a full and grateful acknowledgement of its merits. It naturally led to a friendly intercourse between us: for what is more powerful, when good moral qualities are not deficient, to attract and bind one man to another, than fellowship in elevating intellectual pursuits.

The method of investigation adopted in your work, shows the reason why the ancients did not reduce elocution to a science. Recent times first disclosed the true mode of investigating nature; and your treatise will be admitted by all competent judges, to be a triumphant exhibition of its efficacy.

This “Grammar of Elocution,” is fruit gathered from the vine which you planted; it is adapted to special purposes, which will be set forth in the preface, but is by no means intended as a substitute for

your

valuable work. In what I have said of that work, I have only discharged a debt of public justice, and told what I believe to be the truth ; I confess it has been with pleasure, because I can subscribe myself Your sincere Friend and Servant,

JONATHAN BARBER
New-HAVEN, Jan. 1830,

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