The Westminster Review, Volum 158

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Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1902

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Pàgina 208 - That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birth, (wherein they are not guilty Since nature cannot choose his origin,) By their o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason...
Pàgina 566 - Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep, the innocent sleep ; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ;— Lady M.
Pàgina 208 - That, for some vicious mole of nature in them, As in their birth, wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin; By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason; Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners— that these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature's livery or fortune's star, His virtues else, be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo, Shall in the general censure...
Pàgina 202 - Pale and haggard faces, lank and bony figures, children with the countenances of old men, deformities with irons upon their limbs, boys of stunted growth, and others whose long meagre legs would hardly bear their stooping bodies, all crowded on the view together ; there were the bleared eye, the hare-lip, the crooked foot, and every ugliness or distortion that told of unnatural aversion conceived by parents for their offspring...
Pàgina 549 - ... in their university. They highly extol the man's learning and probity ; and will not be persuaded, that the university will make any difficulty of conferring such a favour upon a stranger, if he is recommended by the dean. They say, he is not afraid of the strictest examination, though he is of so long a journey; and will venture it, if the dean thinks it necessary ; choosing rather to die upon the road, than be starved to death in translating for booksellers ; which has been his only subsistence...
Pàgina 568 - Socrates had been standing and thinking about something ever since the break of day. At last, in the evening after supper, some lonians out of curiosity (I should explain that this was not in winter but in summer), brought out their mats and slept in the open air that they might watch him and see whether he would stand all night. There he stood all night until the following morning ; and with the return of light he offered up a prayer to the sun, and went his way.
Pàgina 414 - Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils; freely ye have received, freely give. Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass, in your purses; nor scrip for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves ; for the workman is worthy of his meat.
Pàgina 570 - ... the beauty of one form is akin to the beauty of another ; and then if beauty of form in general is his pursuit, how foolish would he be not to recognize that the beauty in every form is one and the same...
Pàgina 335 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.
Pàgina 202 - ... infancy, had been one horrible endurance of cruelty and neglect. There were little faces which should have been handsome, darkened with the scowl of sullen, dogged suffering...

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