Uncle Tom's Cabin, Or, Life Among the Lowly ; The Minister's Wooing ; Oldtown Folks

Portada
In this Library of America volume are the best and most enduring works of Harriet Beecher Stowe, "the little woman," as Abraham Lincoln said when he met her in 1861, "who wrote the book that made this great war." He was referring, with rueful exaggeration, to Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), which during its first year had sold over 300,000 copies. Contemporary readers can still appreciate the powerful effects of its melodramatic characterizations and its unapologetic sentimentality. They can also recognize in its treatment of racial violence some of the brooding imagination and realism that anticipates Faulkner's rendering of the same theme. Stowe was charged with exaggerating the evils of slavery, but her stay in Cincinnati, Ohio, where her father (the formidable Lyman Beecher, head of the Lane Theological Seminary) gave her a close look at the miseries of the slave communities across the Ohio River. People in her circle of friends were continually harboring slaves who escaped across the river from Kentucky on the way, they hoped, to Canada.

Two other novels, along with Uncle Tom's Cabin, show the range and variety of her literary accomplishment. The Minister's Wooing (1859) is set in Newport, Rhode Island, after the Revolution. It is a romance based in part on the life of Stowe's sister, and it traces to a happy ending the conflicts in a young woman between adherence to Calvinistic rigor and her expression of preference in the choice of a marital partner. The third novel, Oldtown Folks (1869), confirms Stowe's genius for the realistic rendering of ordinary experience, her talent for social portraiture with a keen satiric edge, and her subtlety in exploring a wide group of themes, from child-rearing practices and religious controversy to romantic seduction and betrayal. But finally, it is the old town and a way of life that no longer exists that is the true subject of this elegiac novel.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
 

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Continguts

Preface
9
CHAPTER II
22
CHAPTER IV
32
CHAPTER V
45
CHAPTER VI
57
CHAPTER VII
67
CHAPTER VIII
81
CHAPTER IX
98
CHAPTER VI
577
CHAPTER VII
587
CHAPTER VIII
598
CHAPTER IX
609
CHAPTER X
618
CHAPTER XI
628
CHAPTER XII
636
CHAPTER XIII
652

CHAPTER X
116
CHAPTER XI
127
CHAPTER XII
142
CHAPTER XIII
162
CHAPTER XIV
172
CHAPTER XV
183
CHAPTER XVII
220
CHAPTER XVIII
240
VOLUME II
257
CHAPTER XXXII
301
CHAPTER XXXIII
408
CHAPTER XXXIV
416
CHAPTER XXXV
430
CHAPTER XXXVI
437
CHAPTER XXXVII
446
CHAPTER XXXVIII
453
CHAPTER XXXIX
464
CHAPTER XL
475
CHAPTER XLI
483
CHAPTER XLII
490
CHAPTER XLIII
497
CHAPTER XLIV
504
CHAPTER XLV
510
CHAPTER I
524
CHAPTER II
535
The Interview
544
CHAPTER IV
552
CHAPTER V
567
CHAPTER XV
669
CHAPTER XVI
676
CHAPTER XXXV
832
CHAPTER XXXVI
838
CHAPTER XXXVIII
852
CHAPTER XXV
880
CHAPTER XXXII
882
Preface
883
CHAPTER III
901
CHAPTER V
921
CHAPTER VI
943
CHAPTER VII
965
Harrys First Days Work
989
CHAPTER XI
1008
CHAPTER XIII
1021
CHAPTER XV
1037
The Journey to Cloudland
1281
CHAPTER XXXIV
1308
CHAPTER XLII
1324
CHAPTER XXXVII
1344
CHAPTER XXXIX
1363
CHAPTER XLI
1383
CHAPTER XLIII
1397
CHAPTER XLV
1419
CHAPTER XLVII
1436
Chronology
1469
Copyright

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Sobre l'autor (1982)

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, daughter of the Reverend Lyman Beecher of the local Congregational Church. In 1832, the family moved to Cincinnati, where Harriet married Calvin Ellis Stowe, a professor at the seminary, in 1836. The border town of Cincinnati was alive with abolitionist conflict and there Mrs. Stowe took an active part in community life. She came into contact with fugitive slaves, and learned from friends and from personal visits what life was like for the Negro in the South. In 1850, the Fugitive Slave Law was passed, and that same year Harriet's sister-in-law urged the author to put her feelings about the evils of slavery into words. Uncle Tom's Cabin was first published serially during 1851-52 in The National Era, and in book form in 1852. In one year more than 300,000 copies of the novel were sold. Mrs. Stowe continued to write, publishing eleven other novels and numerous articles before her death at the age of eighty-five in Hartford, Connecticut.

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