Mr. Macaulay's Character of the Clergy in the Latter Part of the Seventeenth Century, Considered: With an Appendix on His Character of the Gentry, as Given in His History of England

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J. Deighton, 1849 - 116 pàgines
 

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Pàgina 113 - Annotations on the Acts of the Apostles. Original and selected. Designed principally for the use of Candidates for the Ordinary BA Degree, Students for Holy Orders, &c., with College and Senate-House Examination Papers. By the Rev. TR MASKEW, MA Second Edition, enlarged. 12mo. 5».
Pàgina 85 - The coarse and ignorant squire who thought that it belonged to his dignity to have grace said every day at his table by an ecclesiastic in full canonicals, found means to reconcile dignity with economy. A young Levite — such was the phrase then in use — might be had for his board, a small garret, and ten pounds a year...
Pàgina 96 - His chief pleasures were commonly derived from field sports and from an unrefined sensuality. His language and pronunciation were such as we should now expect to hear only from the most ignorant clowns. His oaths, coarse jests, and scurrilous terms of abuse, were uttered with the broadest accent of his province.
Pàgina 85 - Who, though in silken scarf and cassock drest, Wears but a gayer livery at best. When dinner calls the implement must wait With holy words to consecrate the meat, But hold it for a favour seldom known, If he be deign'd the honour to sit down.
Pàgina 49 - Hardly one living in fifty enabled the incumbent to bring up a family comfortably. As children multiplied and grew, the household of the priest became more and more beggarly. Holes appeared more and more plainly in the thatch of his parsonage and in his single cassock. Often it was only by toiling on his glebe, by feeding swine, and by loading...
Pàgina 26 - ... studied to raise those who conversed with him to a nobler set of thoughts, and to consider religion as a seed of a deiform nature (to use one of his own phrases). In order to this, he set young students much on reading the ancient philosophers, chiefly Plato, Tully, and Plotin, and on considering the Christian religion as a doctrine sent from God, both to elevate and sweeten human nature, in which he was a great example, as well as a wise and kind instructor.
Pàgina 17 - ... was already a mark for the invectives of one half of the writers of the age, when, in the cause of good taste, good sense, and good morals, he gave battle to the other half. Strong as his political prejudices were, he seems on this occasion to have entirely laid them aside. He has forgotten that he is a Jacobite, and remembers only that he is a citizen and a Christian.

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