In God's Name: Genocide and Religion in the Twentieth Century

Portada
Visiting Raoul Wallenberg Professor Omer Bartov, Omer Bartov, Phyllis Mack
Berghahn Books, 2001 - 401 pàgines

Despite the widespread trends of secularization in the 20th century, religion has played an important role in several outbreaks of genocide since the First World War. And yet, not many scholars have looked either at the religious aspects of modern genocide, or at the manner in which religion has taken a position on mass killing. This collection of essays addresses this hiatus by examining the intersection between religion and state-organized murder in the cases of the Armenian, Jewish, Rwandan, and Bosnian genocides. Rather than a comprehensive overview, it offers a series of descrete, yet closely related case studies, that shed light on three fundamental aspects of this issue: the use of religion to legitimize and motivate genocide; the potential of religious faith to encourage physical and spiritual resistance to mass murder; and finally, the role of religion in coming to terms with the legacy of atrocity.

 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Continguts

Introduction
1
Chapter
14
Theology and Practice
21
Chapter 2
57
Chapter 6
62
The Protestant
79
Chapter 4
106
Chapter 5
123
Chapter 9
209
Chapter 10
222
Chapter 11
243
Chapter 12
259
Politics Faith and Representation
265
Chapter 15
316
Chapter 16
342
Chapter 17
350

Christian Churches and Genocide in Rwanda
139
Chapter 7
161
Chapter 8
180
Ian Kershaw
372
Conclusion
384
Copyright

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Sobre l'autor (2001)

Omer Bartov is John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of History at Brown University. He was a Visiting Fellow at the Davis Center, Princeton University, and a Junior Fellow at Harvard's Society of Fellows.

Informació bibliogràfica