Essays in a Series of Letters to a Friend ...

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1806
 

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Pàgina 214 - But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, to an innumerable company of angels, to the general assembly and church of the firstborn who are registered in heaven, to God, the Judge of all, to the spirits of just men made perfect, to Jesus the Mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling that speaks better things than that of Abel.
Pàgina 10 - Christianity taken in this view contains — a humiliating estimate of the moral condition of man, as a being radically corrupt — the doctrine of redemption from that condition by the merit and sufferings of Christ — the doctrine of a divine influence being necessary to transform the character of the human mind, in order to prepare it for a higher' station in the universe — and a grand moral peculiarity by which it insists on humility, penitence, and a separation from the spirit and habits...
Pàgina 131 - Let this susceptible youth, after having mingled and burned in imagination among heroes, whose valour and anger flame like Vesuvius, who wade in blood, trample on dying foes, and hurl defiance against earth and heaven ; let him be led into the company of Jesus Christ and his disciples, as displayed by the evangelists, with whose narrative, I will suppose, he is but slightly acquainted before. What must he, what can he, do with his feelings in this transition ? He will find himself flung as far as...
Pàgina 12 - IN the view of an intelligent and honest mind the religion of Christ stands as clear of all connexion with the corruption of men, and churches, and ages, as when it was first revealed. It retains its purity like Moses in Egypt, or Daniel in Babylon, or the Saviour of the world himself while he mingled with scribes and pharisees, or publicans and sinners.
Pàgina 139 - I cannot ^ustly be required to assign that consequence. I cannot be required to do more than exhibit in a simple light an important point of truth. If such works do really impart their own genuine spirit to the mind of an admiring reader, in proportion to the degree in which he admires, and if this spirit is totally hostile to that of Christianity, and if Christianity ought really and in good faith to be the supreme regent of all moral feeling, then it is evident that the Iliad, and all books which...
Pàgina 75 - I shall be pardoned for repeating this once more, that since the peculiar words can be kept in one invariable signification only by keeping that signification clearly in sight by means of something separate from these words themselves...
Pàgina 219 - Those skies, through which it rolls, must all have end. What then is man ? The smallest part of nothing. Day buries day ; month, month ; and year the year ! Our life is but a chain of many deaths. Can then Death's self be feared?
Pàgina 273 - ... that could in any point injure the sacred cause. This claim has been slighted by so many as have lent attraction to an order of moral sentiments greatly discordant with its principles. And so many are gone into eternity under the charge of having employed their genius, as the magicians their enchantments against Moses, to counteract the Saviour of the world.
Pàgina 114 - A principal device in the fabrication of this style is to multiply epithets, dry epithets, laid on the surface, and into which no vitality of the sentiment is found to circulate. You may take a number of the words out of each page, and find that the sense is neither more nor less for your having cleared the composition of these epithets of chalk of various colours, with which the tame thoughts had submitted...
Pàgina 246 - But still it is striking to observe how small a' portion of the ideas, which distinguish the New Testament from other books, many moral philosophers have thought indispensable to a theory in which they professed to include the sum of the duty and interests of man. A serious reader is constrained to feel that either there is too much in that book, or too little in theirs. He will perceive that, in the inspired book, the moral principles are intimately interwoven with all those doctrines which could...

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