Imatges de pàgina
PDF
EPUB

carried away.

to the stars, in order to see that they appear, and night is actually come, before sitting down to eat.

(12.) This is the manner in which the approach of the fairies is usually described.

(13.) The fairy castles were supposed to be moveable at pleasure, invisible to human eyes, and generally built in ancient forths or raths.

(14.) It was a general superstition that a new-born child, before baptism or even the mother herself, might be thus

(15.) It was vulgarly thought that the fairies take such women as Mary was, to nurse those children whom they have carried away.

(16.) These were all celebrated haunts of the fabled sprites.

(17.) This chief was one of the many, whom the fertile invention of poets has assigned to the fairies; and whom the simple credulity of the ignorant has received. Finvar was another of these kings, whose enchanted castle was at Knock Magha, as that of Macaneantan was at Sgraba.

(18.) This story affords a specinien of the popular superstitions of Ireland. Such fictions prevail, more or less, in all countries, according to the degree of information which the common people possess. And it is much to be regretted that they should be very prevalent in the country parts of Ireland, owing, in a great measure, to the want of more valuable knowledge. There is reason to hope, however, that the decay of such superstitions is not far distant, and that the diffusion of learning will remove every vestige of them. In the mean time, these playful 'inventions of fancy will

the reader; nor will they appear more extravagant than the poetic fictions of ancient times.

serve to

amuse

END OF THE SECOND PART.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The Irish characters are the following; viz.

FIGURE.

NAME.

SOUND.

bb Cc Do E G f 7 g li L i M m N 11

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Ailm
Beit
Coll, ceit
Duir, deit
Eada
Fearann
Gort, geit
Ioga
Luis
Muin
Nuin
Oir
Peit
Ruis
Suil
Teine
Ur
Uat

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

てこ

S
t

Uu

Тъ

U h

The alphabet was variously arranged by ancient authors, usually beginning with 6, 1, and n; but the above has been universally adopted by the moderns.

The

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

The following abbreviations are commonly used in printed books: viz,

bh, ch, dlı, fh, gh, mh, ph, sh, th, tt. 7

Ý Š ή * τ

[ocr errors]

31

7 ro I
rol

Î m
agus, ar, air, ao, ea, cht, ui, nn,

Many other contractions have been introduced, in different books, but those that are inserted here are the most usual, and the rest may be found in the plates of contractions, at the end of the book.

The following sentences will fuộnish an exercise, in reading the Irish character.

[blocks in formation]

Seatinajte, an trear cajbrojt.

1. 21 mc, na, dearmajd mo oligead: aćt čajme a daó do crolóe majčcanta.

2. Oir do "bearajó pad cugad pad Laeckaó, 7 fposal fang, 7 pjočćajn.

3. Na tregeaV trocajne 7 Piriñe ču; erangajt pad bragajo jad, air clar to crojoe.

4. Marcin Dogeabą tų Kaliar, agur Tagge piggė a revanc de 7 ovine.

5. Cvinti do vojš a ndja ne do vile érojoe, 7 na bj čaol ME DO ČVIGTE XEIN.

6. 211, do iliščji vle adrivs WJON, 7 Do vtana re do fljóće díreac.

7. Na bi glic an do frib xén: boo Eagla Dé ort, 7 peačajn, an tolc.

7 8. b;ajo rin na lájnte DOD imtini, 7 na pinjon Tod cnariivib.

9. Onorvig an Tigeanna le to magin, 7 le Primjoil hvile viš.

PROVERBS,

« AnteriorContinua »