Imatges de pÓgina
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SPELMAN'S ANABASIS is one of the most accurate an elegant Translations that any language has produced.'Gibbon.

"A very faithful and useful version.'--CLARKE'S BIBLIC GRAPHICAL MISCELLANY.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

OF

XENOPHON.

.

XENOPHON was the son of Gryllus, an Athenian: he was born at Athens, and distinguished himself as a philosopher, a general, and an historian. Much uncertainty however exists concerning his origin and earliest years; yet from his connexions and resources he must have been well born and well educated. He was exquisitely formed, and so engaging in his manners, that Socrates was induced to admit him among his disciples. It is said that Socrates, meeting him in a narrow gateway, extended his walking-stick across it, so as to obstruct his passage, inquiring how a man could acquire the means of profit ? and on receiving a suitable reply, he inquired farther, how men could attain to virtue and honor ? Xenophon being at a loss for an answer, the philosopher added, Follow me and

learn. From this time he entered under h tion, and became eminently qualified for a offices of public as well as private life. Havi: companied Socrates in the Peloponnesian wa manifested his valor, he was invited by Pro his friend to join Cyrus, who was engaged expedition against his brother Artaxerxes, ki Persia ; but he refused to comply till he a confer with Socrates, who advised him to coi the oracle of Apollo at Delphi. This he did, merely put the question, under what auspices with what sacrifices he should prepare

for expedition; to which a favorable answer har been returned, he informed Socrates of the res who, after mildly reproving him for his dep ture from the advice he had solicited, hid him out under the direction of the God. Xenoph paid due deference to these injunctions; but bei ambitious, and eager to engage in a distante pedition, he hastened to Sardis, where he w introduced to Cyrus the young prince, and treat with great attention. In the army he show that he was a true disciple of Socrates, and th he had been educated in the warlike city Athens.

The particulars of the March of Cyrus are i

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Ber bideed so minutely described in the · ANABASIS,' for a with reference to the topography and natural history Havinof the various districts through which he travelled,

that it has been thought he was advised, in his Problast interview with Socrates, to write the account. gedi The time for action now approaching, Cyrus s, ki took care to animate his Grecian troops by renewed he cand splendid promises, and to warn them of the co con immense superiority of numbers with which they did, would have to contend, encouraging them at the

same time with assurances that they would find the
Persian soldiers less than women.

Cyrus assigned the Greeks a position on the right here of his army, flanked by the Euphrates, and dis de rected Clearchus to command their right wing, and

hin Menon the left. And here for the first time Xenoenopi phon makes mention of bimself. Cyrus rode along ut be at a moderate distance surveying both armies, lookEant ing now at the enemy, now at his friends. Xeno. he-phon seeing him from the Grecian line, rode out treal to meet him, and inquired if he had any comshow mands for him. Stopping his horse, Cyrus deod tb sired him to tell them all, that the sacrifices and city

victims were favorable. While he was saying this,

he heard a clamor through the ranks, and asked in what it was. Xenophon told him that they were

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