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meeting was not always the same, that, according to circum

stances, there might be a latitude of meeting early or late, Sir Charles Sir Charles Bunbury observed, that no particular hour could Benburg. be fixed for reading the orders of the day, for that would de

pend on the time taken up by the private bufiness. He conceived, that the reason why the House met at lo late an hour, was the necessity the servants of the crown were under of attending other business in the early part of the day; yet he was for fixing the hour of adjournment not at nine or ten,

but twelve or one. Sir George

Sir G. Yonge observed, that an alteration in the nominal Pange. hour of meeting was of no manner of consequence, but he

wished an hour might be fixed for the orders of the House

being moved. Mr. Cbarles Mr. Charles Jenkinson said, it was not a regard to the conJenkinsou venience of ministry only that delayed the ineeting of the

Houfe; lawyers, merchants, and other men of business, were employed in the forenoon in private business, and could not attend that of the public.

A conversation of this kind was continued for some time; but a motion having been made and seconded, that the House do adjourn, it was carried without a division.

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The Report of the Commifferners for examining, taking, and stating

the public Accounts of this Kingdom, to the honourable the House of Commons, in pursuance of an order dated the 10th of NoPember, 1780.

To the honourable the knights, citizens, and burgesses in

Parliament assembled.

In obedience to an order of this honourable House, bearing date the roth November inftant, " That the commissioners appointed by an act, passed in the last session of parliament, for examining, taking, and stating the public accounts of this kingdom, do forthwith report to this House what progress they have made therein;" We

report, That as soon as the act, by which we were conftituted, was passed, and a proper place for our reception could be provided, we entered upon the execution of the act;

and

B A T E s. and after the necessary arrangements of office and forms of proceeding were settled, we, in the first place, in obedience to the express directions of the act, made use of all the necessary means for coming at a knowledge of the names of all persons in the receipt of public money, or to whom public money unaccounted for had been issued, that we might direct precepts for an account of the balances in their hands, in order to examine what part thereof might be applied to the public service.

From time to time, as such information (not procured without difficulty, nor without delay) has been obtained, we have issued precepts in consequence thereof, to which, for the most part, returns have been made. We have received accounts of the balances in the hands of the receivers general of the land tax, and of the representatives of those who are dead; of the different treasurers and representatives of treasurers of the navy, whose accounts are unsettled ; of the different paymasters, and representatives of paymasters, of his Majesty's forces, whose accounts are unsettled; and of various other classes of public accountants; reports of which will be made to his Majesty, and to both Houses of Parliament, in pursuance of the directions of the act, as soon as such examinations have been taken as are necessary to enable us to judge what part of those balances may be immediately taken out of the hands of the public accountants, and applied to the public service,

We began these enquiries with the receivers general of the land tax, of whom we have examined as many as we thought necessary, not only as to the public money in their hands, but also as to the mode of collecting, receiving, paying in, and accounting for, the taxes received by them. Upon the first part of this enqiry, namely, as to the public money in their hands, we are preparing a report, which we hope will be foor ready to be presented.

As the excise is one of the most considerable branches of the public revenue, we have examined several of the officers in its different departments, as well to be informed of the - mode and manner in which it is collected and paid in, as to enable us to judge with what comparative expence, efficacy, and dispatch, the land tax is collected and paid into the Exchequer.

The returns of balances from the treasurers of the navy, whose names as public accountants stand first in the general A. 1780. certificate of accounts depending in the office of the auditor of the imprest, are now under our consideration. We have examined the Right Honourable Earl Temple, reprefentative of the late George Grenville, esq. the Right Hon. Lord Viscount Barrington; the Right Hon. Lord Viscount Howe; Sir Gilbert Elliot, Baronet, representatives of the late Sir Gilbert Elliot, Baronet ; and the Right Hon. Welbore Ellis; and we are now collecting such other information as may enable us to report upon the balances respectively in their hands.

certificate

In the execution of the truft vefted in us, we have proceeded with as much expedition as we found consistent with the difficulty aud importance of the objects before us, and an exact and impartial attention to the interests of the public, and the rights of individuals.

A commission of accounts, to the extent and for the pur. poses expressed in the act, is not an ordinary inftitution; and we have been obliged to content ourselves with the suggestions of our own understandings, unaffifted either by the lights of our ancestors or the experience of cotemporaries. A reference to the minutes of our proceedings, will, if called for, thew that we have at least been diligent and perlevering.

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An Account of the Gross and Nest Produce of the LAND-TAX, for the

laf Four Years as far as the same can be made up, viz. from the Year 1774 to the Year 1777, inclusive, diftinguishing each Year ; witho in the Division of James Weft, Esq. one of the Auditors of the Court og Exchequer.

1774. 35. per pound. Counties.

Nett produce. ..

d. Bedford

21,416

20,839 911 Berks

30,632 1961 29,808 2 101 Bucks -35,357 6 103

34,405 5 81 Cainbridge

24,515 12 31 23,855 911 Cornwall

23,957 5 101 23,312 4 0. Cumberland and Westmoreland

5,069 6 6} 4,932 16 73 Devon

61,937 13 0 60,269 17 53 Dorset

24,809 18 43 24,038 14 63 Effex

67,049 8 101

65,244 0 8 Gloúcester

35,478 14 10 34,511 04 Hereford

15,307 7

14,803 6.71 Hertford

31,712 o 4 30,845 19 st Huntingdon

11,622 18 9 11,309 19 8 Kent

61,914 19 111 60,247 16 63 Lancaster

15,745 35 15,321 4 2 3 Liecester

26,013 16 94

25,313 7 63 London, Westminster and Middlesex

221,544 10 0

211,578 19 47 Norfolk

63,233 0 52 61,530 7 51 Northampton and Rutland 39,899 16 91 38,825 9 51 Oxford

29,041 6 10

28,243 19 2% Salop

21,793

21,206 3 72 Somerset

54,358 7 32 52,752 16 23 Southampton

41,205 13 53 40,096 2 9 Stafford

20,340 17 81

19,793 3 84 Suffolk

55,132 18 61

53,648 7 Surrey

49,599 15 4

48,264 4 3 Suifex

45,026 14 82 43,814 Whitehall and St. James's Palaces

23,065 14 81

22,444 13 ! Warwick

29,842 6 3 29,038 15 Wilts

38,743 5 94 37,700 6 Worcester

25,186 15

24,334 11 10 York

68,626 18 11

66,69197 Durham and Northumb.

18,861 13 9

18,259 16 111 Insupers returned, and 1,338,043 11 10% 1,301,282 3 101

given in charge, to be levied by the sheriffs

752 13 43 Totals

£. 1,338,043 II ICH 1,302,034 17 21 Vol. XVIII.

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1775: 35. per. Pound.
Counties.
Grofs charge.

Nett produce,
ke
d.

£. s. d. Bedford

21,416 2 51 20,839 9 Ž Berks

30,632 1961 29,808 2 103 Bucks

35,357 6 101 34,705 5 81 Cambridge

24,515 12 31 23,855 10 Cornwall

23,312 4 43 Cumberland and West. moreland

5,0696 61

4,932 16 7 Devon

61,939 13 of 60, 271 16 43 Dorset

24,809 18 47 24,038 5 9 Effex

67,049 8 101 65,244 o 61 Gloucester

35,478 11

34,523 5 Hereford

15,307 9

14,895 5 Hertford

31,712
0 41

30,772 12 Huntingdon

11,622 18 9

11,309 19 Kent

61,914 19 11 60,243 16 61 Lancaster

15,745 3 5 15,321 4 27 Leicester

26,018 16 91 25,318 4 10 London, Westminster, and Middlesex

215,578 19 4} Norfolk

63,238 07 61,535 4 11 Northampton and Rutland 39,897 16 91 38,683 3 81 Oxford

29,041

28,242 8 35 Salop

21,793

21,206 3 71 Somerset

53,358 4

52,689 19 3 Southampton

40,096 5 10 Stafford

20,340 17 8

19,793 3 81 Suffolk

53,648 101 Surrey

49,599 15

48,053 3 Sussex

45,926 16

43,814 8

1 Whitehall and St. James's Palaces

23,06; 14 81 22444 13 13 Warwick

29,842 6

29,038 15 Wilts

38,743 5

37,700

62 Worcester

25,186 15 23

24,386 18 111 York

68,622 6

66,774 10 81 Durham and Northum. berland

18,861 13 9

18,262 14 31

221,544 10 01

6 10

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41,205 16 61

55,132 18 8

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مامام

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Insupers returned, and

given in charge, to be levied by the Theriff's

1,001 13 33 1,302,046 15 67

1,338,048 19 98

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