Shame: Theory, Therapy, Theology

Portada
Cambridge University Press, 5 d’oct. 2000 - 343 pàgines
In this book, first published in 2000, Stephen Pattison considers the nature of shame as it is discussed in the diverse discourses of literature, psychology, psychoanalysis, philosophy, history and sociology and concludes that 'shame' is not a single unitary phenomenon, but rather a set of separable but related understandings in different discourses. Situating chronic shame primarily within the metaphorical ecology of defilement, pollution and toxic unwantedness, Pattison goes on to examine the causes and effects of shame. He then considers the way in which Christianity has responded to and used shame. Psychologists, philosophers, theologians and therapists will find this a fascinating source of insight, and it will be of particular use to pastoral workers and those concerned with religion and mental health.
 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Continguts

Emotional confusion
21
Problems in approaching shame
39
Overview of Part II
66
The ecology of shame
69
Chronic shame
93
Some effects and implications of chronic shame
110
Aspects of the sociohistorical significance of shame
131
Dealing with shame the task of integration
154
bringing Christianity into the picture
186
Modern Christian responses to shame
189
Shame in Christianity
229
Towards more adequate approaches to shame
275
Epilogue
310
Bibliography
317
Index
335
Copyright

towards a working understanding of shame
181

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Passatges populars

Pàgina 1 - Though terror speaks to life and death and distress makes of the world a vale of tears, yet shame strikes deepest into the heart of man. While terror and distress hurt, they are wounds inflicted from outside which penetrate the smooth surface of the ego ; but shame is felt as an inner torment, a sickness of the soul.

Sobre l'autor (2000)

Stephen Pattison is Professor of Religion, Ethics, and Practice and H. G. Wood Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham. His latest books are The Challenge of Practical Theology (2007), Seeing Things: Deepening Relations with Visual Artefacts (2007) and Saving Face: Enfacement, Shame, Theology (2013).

Informació bibliogràfica