A Manual of Mental Science for Teachers and Students: Or, Childhood: Its Character and Culture

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L. N. Fowler, 1897 - 235 pÓgines
 

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PÓgina 164 - Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can transpose to form and dignity. Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind ; And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind...
PÓgina 199 - I shall pass through this world but once. Any good thing therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.
PÓgina 140 - tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What is the jay more precious than the lark Because his feathers are more beautiful ? Or is the adder better than the eel Because his painted skin contents the eye ? O, no, good Kate ; neither art thou the worse For this poor furniture and mean array.
PÓgina 205 - OH for a lodge in some vast wilderness, Some boundless contiguity of shade, Where rumor of oppression and deceit, Of unsuccessful or successful war, Might never reach me more...
PÓgina 155 - A MOTHER'S LOVE A MOTHER'S Love, — how sweet the name ! What is a Mother's love ? — A noble, pure, and tender flame, Enkindled from above, To bless a heart of earthly mould ; The warmest love that can grow cold ; This is a Mother's Love.
PÓgina 53 - Hail, MEMORY, hail ! in thy exhaustless mine From age to age unnumbered treasures shine ! Thought and her shadowy brood thy call obey, And Place and Time are subject to thy sway ! Thy pleasures most we feel, when most alone ; The only pleasures we can call our own.
PÓgina 67 - ... face of heaven, which, from afar, Comes down upon the waters ; all its hues, From the rich sunset to the rising star, Their magical variety diffuse : And now they change ; a paler shadow strews Its mantle o'er the mountains ; parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, till — 'tis gone — and all is gray.
PÓgina 57 - Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men May read strange matters : — to beguile the time, Look like the time ; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue : look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
PÓgina 84 - OFT in the stilly night, Ere Slumber's chain has bound me, Fond Memory brings the light Of other days around me; The smiles, the tears, Of boyhood's years, The words of love then spoken; The eyes that shone, Now dimmed and gone, The cheerful hearts now broken ! Thus, in the stilly night, Ere Slumber's chain has bound me, Sad Memory brings the light Of other days around me.
PÓgina 117 - True wit is nature to advantage dress'd; What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd; Something, whose truth convinc'd at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.

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