Dietetic and Hygienic Gazette, Volum 28

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Gazette Publishing Company, 1912
 

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Pāgina 417 - Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty: For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo The means of weakness and debility; Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man In all your business and necessities.
Pāgina 550 - I feel, as well I may, sweet Mary ! thou art dead ! If thou wouldst stay, e'en as thou art, all cold and all serene — I still might press thy silent heart, and where thy smiles have been ! While e'en thy chill bleak corse I have, thou seemest still mine own ; But there, I lay thee in thy grave — and I am now alone ! I do not think, where'er thou art, thou hast forgotten me ; And I, perhaps, may soothe this heart, in thinking, too, of thee : Yet there was round thee such a dawn of light ne'er...
Pāgina 169 - THIS is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks, Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight, Stand like Druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic, Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
Pāgina 413 - The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slippered pantaloon ; With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side ; His youthful hose well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank ; and his big, manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound.
Pāgina 167 - Lilac and star and bird twined with the chant of my soul, There in the fragrant pines and the cedars dusk and dim.
Pāgina 331 - To live content with small means — to seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion — to be worthy, not respectable, and wealthy, not rich— to...
Pāgina 417 - At half past nine by the meet'n'-house clock,— Just the hour of the Earthquake shock! —What do you think the parson found, When he got up and stared around? The poor old chaise in a heap or mound, As if it had been to the mill and ground! You see, of course, if you're not a dunce, How it went to pieces all at once,— All at once, and nothing first,— Just as bubbles do when they burst.
Pāgina 610 - The moon above the eastern wood Shone at its full; the hill-range stood Transfigured in the silver flood, Its blown snows flashing cold and keen, Dead white, save where some sharp ravine Took shadow, or the sombre green Of hemlocks turned to pitchy black Against the whiteness at their back.
Pāgina 550 - The time would e'er be o'er, And I on thee should look my last, And thou shouldst smile no more! And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again ; And still the thought I will not brook, That I must look in vain ! But when I speak— thou dost not say What thou ne'er left'st unsaid...
Pāgina 550 - Go, forget me — why should sorrow O'er that brow a shadow fling ? Go. forget me — and to-morrow Brightly smile and sweetly sing. Smile — though I shall not be near thee, Sing, though I shall never hear thee; May thy soul with pleasure shine Lasting as the gloom of mine.

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