New Guide to the Royal Leamington Spa, the Neighbouring Towns, and Surrounding Country

Portada
Reeve, 1839 - 165 pàgines
 

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 87 - Good friend, for Jesus' sake, forbear To dig the dust enclosed here. Blessed be he that spares these stones, And curst be he that moves my bones.
Pàgina 116 - Even such is Time, that takes on trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with age and dust : Who, in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days. But from this earth, this grave, this dust, The Lord shall raise me up, I trust...
Pàgina 147 - When there has been no particular storm about the time of the spring equinox, (March 21) if a storm arise from the east on or before that day, or if a storm from any point of the compass arise near a week after the equinox, then, in either of these cases, the succeeding summer is generally dry, four times in fixe.
Pàgina 148 - DEW. — If the dew lies plentifully on the grass after a fair day, it is a sign of another. If not, and there is no wind, rain must follow. — A red evening portends fine weather ; but if it spread too far upwards from the horizon in the evening, and especially morning, it foretells wind or rain, 0r both.
Pàgina 148 - AVhtiii the clouds are formed like fleeces, but dense in the middle and bright towards the edges, with the sky bright, they are signs of a frost, with hail, snow, or rain. If clouds form high in air, in thin white trains like locks of wool, they portend wind, and probably rain. When a general cloudiness covers the sky, and small black fragments of clouds fly underneath, they are a sure sign of rain, and probably it will be lasting. Two currents of clouds always portend rain, and, in summer, thunder.
Pàgina 96 - In the hollow of this rock was beheaded, on the 1st day of July, 1312, by barons lawless as himself, Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall, the minion of a hateful king, in life and death a memorable instance of misrule.
Pàgina 81 - He ne'er gave quarter t' any such. The trenchant blade, Toledo trusty. For want of fighting was grown rusty, And ate into itself, for lack Of somebody to hew and hack.
Pàgina 95 - the very seat of pleasantness ;" and Sir William Dugdale remarked that it is "a place this of so great delight, in respect to the river gliding below the rock, the dry and wholesome situation, and the fair grove of lofty elms overshadowing it, that to one who desireth a retired life, either for his devotions or study, the like is hardly to be found.
Pàgina 147 - This table and the accompanying remarks are the result of many years' actual observation ; the whole being constructed on a due consideration of the attraction of the sun and moon in their several positions respecting the earth ; and will, by simple inspection, show the observer what kind of weather will most probably follow the entrance of the moon into any of her quarters, and that so near the truth as to be seldom or never found to fail.
Pàgina 148 - Moses' horns — if white at setting, or shorn of his rays, or if he goes down into a bank of clouds in the horizon, bad weather is to be expected. If the moon looks pale and dim, we expect rain ; if red, wind ; and if of her natural colour, with a clear sky, fair weather. If the moon is rainy throughout, it...

Informació bibliogràfica