The Text of Shakespeare Vindicated from the Interpolations and Corruptions Advocated by John Payne Collier, Esq., in His Notes and Emendations, Volum 70

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W. Pickering, 1853 - 312 pàgines
 

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Pàgina xviii - For whilst, to the shame of slow-endeavouring art, Thy easy numbers flow, and that each heart • Hath, from the leaves of thy unvalued book, Those Delphic lines with deep impression took, Then thou, our fancy of itself bereaving, Dost make us marble, with too much conceiving ; And, so sepulchred in such pomp dost lie, That kings for such a tomb would wish to die.
Pàgina 39 - Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons...
Pàgina 273 - Here, take this purse, thou whom the heavens' plagues Have humbled to all strokes : that I am wretched Makes thee the happier : — heavens, deal so still ! Let the superfluous and lust-dieted man, That slaves your ordinance, that will not see Because he doth not feel, feel your power quickly ; So distribution should undo excess, And each man have enough.
Pàgina 255 - ... you come to know it,) answer me : Though you untie the winds, and let them fight Against the churches ; though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up; Though bladed corn be lodg'd, and trees blown down; Though castles topple on their warders...
Pàgina 277 - I'd use them so That heaven's vault should crack. — She's gone for ever ! — I know when one is dead, and when one lives ; She's dead as earth. — Lend me a looking-glass ; If that her breath will mist or stain the stone, Why, then she lives.
Pàgina 33 - Thus ornament is but the guiled shore To a most dangerous sea; the beauteous scarf Veiling an Indian beauty; in a word, The seeming truth which cunning times put on To entrap the wisest.
Pàgina 249 - This was the noblest Roman of them all : All the conspirators, save only he, Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought, And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle; and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, This was a man!
Pàgina 130 - The throne he sits on, nor the tide of pomp That beats upon the high shore of this world No, not all these, thrice-gorgeous ceremony, Not all these, laid in bed majestical, Can sleep so soundly as the wretched slave...
Pàgina 203 - There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks ; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body. O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue, That give a coasting welcome ere it comes.
Pàgina 63 - If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. — That strain again ! — it had a dying fall : O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, (') That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour ! — Enough ; no more : 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.

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