The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: With an Essay on His Life and Genius by Arthur Murphy, Volum 10

Portada
F.C. and J. Rivington, 1823

Des de l'interior del llibre

Què en diuen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Pàgines seleccionades

Continguts

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 2 - Christchurch, chose to accept of a studentship there. Mr. Smith's perfections, as well natural as acquired, seem to have been formed upon Horace's plan; who says, in his Art of Poetry...
Pàgina 274 - I assured him, that I did not at all take it ill of Mr. Tickell that he was going to publish his translation ; that he certainly had as much right to translate any author as myself; and that publishing both was entering on a fair stage. I then added, that I would not desire him to look over my first book of the Iliad, because he bad looked over Mr.
Pàgina 145 - What he attempted, he performed; he is never feeble and he did not wish to be energetic; he is never rapid and he never stagnates.
Pàgina 113 - was particular in this writer, that, when he had taken his resolution, or made his plan for what he designed to write, he would walk about a room, and dictate it into language, with as much freedom and ease as any one could write it down, and attend to the coherence and grammar of what he dictated.
Pàgina 26 - At this man's table I enjoyed many cheerful and instructive hours, with companions such as are not often found — with one who has lengthened, and one who has gladdened life ; with Dr. James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered ; and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend. But what are the hopes of man ? I am disappointed by that stroke of death which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure.
Pàgina 141 - That general knowledge which now circulates in common talk, was in his time rarely to be found. Men not professing learning were not ashamed of ignorance; and in the female world any acquaintance with books was distinguished only to be censured.
Pàgina 247 - He began on it ; and when first he mentioned it to Swift, the doctor did not much like the project. As he carried it on, he showed what he wrote to both of us, and we now and then gave a correction, or a word or two of advice ; but it was wholly of his own writing. — When it was done, neither of us thought it would succeed. We showed it to Congreve ; who, after reading it over, said, it would either take greatly, or be damned confoundedly.
Pàgina 247 - This was a good while before the first act was over, and so gave us ease soon ; for that duke (besides his own good taste) has a particular knack, as any one now living, in discovering the taste of the public. He was quite right in this, as usual ; the good-nature of the audience appeared stronger and stronger every act, and ended in a clamour of applause.
Pàgina 119 - To bridle a goddess is no very delicate idea ; but why must she be bridled? because she longs to launch; an act which was never hindered by a bridle : and whither will she launch ? into a nobler strain. She is in the first line a horse, in the second a boat; and the care of the poet is to keep his horse or his boat from singing. The next composition is the far-famed Campaign, which Dr. Warton has termed a " gazette in rhyme," with harshness not often used by the good nature of his criticism.
Pàgina 246 - Dr. Swift had been observing once to Mr. Gay what an odd pretty sort of a thing a Newgate Pastoral might make. Gay was inclined to try at such a thing for some time; but afterwards thought it would be better to write a comedy on the same plan. This was what gave rise to the Beggar's Opera.

Informació bibliogràfica